2016 POD Network Conference

Event Information

Date:
November 9, 2016 - November 13, 2016
Location:

140 N 4th St., Louisville, KY 40202

Registration Information

Hotel:

Galt House Hotel


Conference Program   Session Materials

Transformative Relationships: Fostering Cultures of Deep Learning

INVITATION TO ATTEND

We cordially invite you to participate in the POD Network’s 41st Annual Conference to be held in Louisville, Kentucky at the Galt House Hotel on November 9–13, 2016.

Our conference theme is Transformative Relationships: Fostering Cultures of Deep Learning. We hope that this theme will inspire us to consider the ways that our work impacts change on a broader level through the relationships that we forge within our communities of teaching and learning. After critical reflection during the POD Network’s 40th anniversary where we looked inward about our own practices, we now turn to look outward to consider the types of relationships that would help us to expand our impact and engage in Paolo Freire’s vision of dialogic leadership.

“…to fail to think with the people is a sure way to cease being revolutionary leaders.”
—Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed

Inspired by Freire’s charge, we hope to invite educational developers to explore how to build deeper connections within our institutions and larger societies. How can these personal connections be seen as gateways to transforming our own professional practices and values, encouraging deep learning for our students and strengthening educational and organizational development missions on micro, meso, and macro-levels? Intentional focus on transformative relationships challenges us to take a direct look at the importance of person-to-person interactions. It calls for a shift from focusing only on outcomes and results to emphasizing genuine connections and shared growth. It calls us to go beyond the status quo and to dream of new opportunities to improve the quality of higher education—together. How do you and the people you work with relate to each other? How might learning be deepened by strengthening relationships?

We need to work together with our students, colleagues, partners, allies, mentors, and kindred spirits within and outside the institutions where we work in order to cultivate this type of community-engaged learning in the classroom and beyond. Through these relationships we can work towards fostering cultures of deep learning on a broader level. These collaborations may allow us to think beyond the status quo and challenge us to take action towards our shared vision of higher education.

In order to work more intentionally with our communities towards fostering cultures of deep learning, we offer up the following questions for consideration:

  • What opportunities do we as educational developers have in engaging the beliefs of students, faculty, administrators and public policy makers about the values and benefits of deep learning?
  • How can we support and encourage partnering with students in the enterprise of deep learning?
  • What might students, faculty, administrators and public policy makers think about how closely our current practices do the work of deep learning?

Thinking about deep learning at a cultural level also helps us consider how we need bigger structures to support and enable those practices.

  • In what ways is fostering deep learning rewarded in our institutions?
  • How is deep learning captured in the way that our institutions and policy makers measure success and then supported in key decisions about funding, human resources, tools, and facilities?
  • How might we mobilize the “O” in POD and engage with the organizational focus of our profession to think at a structural level?
  • How can we ensure strong links between everyday practices in the classroom and the mission of the institution?
  • How can we broker engagement between the grassroots communities and top level leadership to encourage transformation organically?
  • How do we lay the groundwork for transforming paradigms, cultures, and structures?
  • How can we keep relationships going strong even through the difficult moments of implementing change, such as a curriculum redesign?

Thinking about collaborations in academic contexts might also lead us to think about the way we structure the production of knowledge in our institutions.

  • Are we siloed within our disciplinary and hierarchical roles?
  • Do we have language and practices that could allow us to foster connections across these traditional boundaries?
  • What of the boundaries between institutions of higher education, policy makers and the public in general?
  • How might a culture of deep learning help us forge relationships that work on the tension that often exists at these boundaries? (What are the tensions that have traditionally kept us from engaging in transformative relationships across boundaries?)
  • How can we engage with the various motivations that students and faculty bring to courses when creating learning experiences at different institutions?

Thinking about the potential for technology to enhance and provide new opportunities for learning might lead us to consider the ways that we can utilize and develop tools to expand collaboration and access to education.

  • How do we encourage faculty and graduate students to leverage technology to create spaces to learn and collaborate in ways that we haven’t learned before?
  • How can educational developers collaborate with teachers and students to envision ways technology can be used to decrease learning barriers?
  • How might educational developers participate in institutional decision making about how to employ technology to expand access to higher education?
  • How might educational developers use technology to mediate encounters between students and communities in order to generate opportunities for understanding and mutually envisioned innovation?

Finally, thinking about the ways we express the value of deep learning may open up space to re-imagine traditional approaches to assessment of student learning, curricula, programs, and institutions as well as our own work as educational developers.

  • How well do current approaches to assessment of student learning and curricular effectiveness capture deep learning?
  • How can we imagine approaches to assessment that are sufficiently individualized to capture depth but sufficiently standardized to be manageable and sustainable?
  • How might we work across the boundaries between institutions of higher education and communities, industries, and government to develop assessment methods that measure student learning by real world standards?
  • How can we engage our communities in assessing the effectiveness of our educational development practices?
  • If we define excellence in educational development practices in part by the extent to which we engage in collaborative engagement with our communities, how might that transform our approaches to educational development?

Just as the fabric of any culture is comprised of the connections between its threads, so too must a culture of deep learning bring all of these partners and their perspectives together in order to achieve a transformative impact. Please plan to join us to engage in transformative dialogues.

Carl S. Moore, Conference Co-Chair carlsmoore.phd@gmail.com
Carol Subiño Sullivan, Conference Co-Chair csubino@cetl.gatech.edu
Lynn Eaton, Program Co-Chair leaton@umhb.edu
Greg Siering, Program Co-Chair gsiering@indiana.edu
Hoag Holmgren, POD Network Executive Director podoffice@podnetwork.org

OVERVIEW OF THE POD NETWORK AND ITS MISSION

The POD Network

The POD Network supports a network of over 1,100 members who have an interest in educational and organizational development. While POD members come primarily from the USA and Canada, the membership also represents 20 other countries. Through its members, the POD Network leads and supports change for the improvement of higher education through faculty, instructional, and organizational development.

The POD Network seeks to promote the scholarship of teaching, learning and organizational development that reflects a spirit of inclusion, where all members are invited to collaborate and interact with colleagues across disciplines and borders.

The POD Mission

The Professional and Organizational Development Network in Higher Education (POD) fosters human development in higher education through faculty, instructional, and organizational development.

POD believes that people have value, as individuals and as members of groups. The development of students is a fundamental purpose of higher education and requires for its success effective advising, teaching, leadership, and management. Central to POD’s philosophy is lifelong, holistic, personal, and professional learning, growth, and change for the higher education community.


OVERVIEW OF THE ANNUAL CONFERENCE

The annual POD Network conference typically attracts between 700 and 1,000 people, and primarily targets practitioners in the fields of educational and organizational development, both novice and experienced. The conference appeals to administrators, faculty, educational developers, graduate and professional student developers, graduate students, independent consultants, members of higher education organizations, and publishers for these communities.

Collectively, program sessions do the following:

  • Actively engage participants
  • Reflect current research and theoretical frameworks
  • Involve colleagues from around the world
  • Address needs of graduate students and both new and experienced faculty
  • Stimulate personal growth
  • Build working partnerships
  • Highlight contributions of diversity

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

Proposal submission is now closed. Proposals featuring best practices, new resources, innovative approaches, discussion of critical issues, presentation of research and work-in-progress were submitted online and were due on Friday, March 11, 2016. All proposals were evaluated using a blind peer-review process. Detailed information about the session types, topic areas, guidelines for submission, submission process, and the Robert J. Menges Honored Presentation Award are included in the Call for Proposals.


PLENARY SESSION

2016 Keynote Speaker: Nikki Giovanni
Friday, November 11, 10:30 am–12:00 noon

 

Nikki Giovanni

About Nikki Giovanni
“I was asked to do a biography so this is it. I am 71 years old. I highly recommend old age; it’s fun. I have been awarded an unprecedented 7 NAACP Image Awards which makes me very very proud. I have been nominated for a Grammy; been a finalist for the National Book Award. I am very proud to have authored 3 New York Times and Los Angeles Times Best Sellers, highly unusual for a poet. I am a University Distinguished Professor at Virginia Tech. I don’t have a lot of friends but I have good ones. I have a son and a granddaughter. My father, mother, sister and middle aunt are all deceased literally making me go from being the baby in the family to being an elder. I like to cook, travel and dream. I’m a writer. I’m happy.”

For a full biography and more information about Giovanni’s body of work, please visit http://www.nikki-giovanni.com/


PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS

Pre-conference Workshop co-chairs: Katie Kearns (kkearns@indiana.edu) and Molly Sutphen (msutphen@email.unc.edu).

Full Day Pre-Conference Workshop

This year’s full-day Pre-Conference Workshops (W1 and W2) begin Wednesday, November 9, 1:30–4:30 pm, and continue on Thursday, November 10, 8:30 am–12:00 noon.

W1—Getting Started: Workshop for New Faculty Developers, $160

Breakfast on Thursday is included for participants of W1. In addition, participants of W1 receive a copy of A Guide to Faculty Development, 2nd Ed.

  • Isis Artze-Vega, Florida International University
  • Jason Craig, Marymount University
  • Peter Felten, Elon University
  • Tershia Pinder-Grover, University of Michigan
  • Suzanne Tapp, Texas Tech University

In this interactive workshop, we will explore both the range of educational development work and common teaching/learning center practices. We will focus on: identifying and acting on educational development priorities in your own context; building skills for consulting, collaborating, and mentoring; assessing your work at an individual and a program/center level; and evaluating the strategic position of your efforts to maximize opportunities to influence institutional change. Each participant will leave the session with an individual action plan, a big-picture view of educational development, and a support network to help you achieve your goals.

Topics: Faculty Professional Development, POD Professional Development

Audience: New/recent faculty developers (5  years or less)

W2—Seven Steps to Publishing SoTL, $130
  • Milton Cox
  • Gregg Wentzell

As educational developers, our responsibilities include assisting interested faculty in developing SoTL. In this workshop two editors of SoTL journals guide participants through 7 steps they can use to enable their faculty to grasp a perspective of SoTL, select a teaching, learning, or institutional problem or opportunity, design a related project (solution, baseline, assessment), draft a proposal for presentation, and use that to leverage a manuscript for publication. We will share resources enabling your faculty to traverse these seven steps. Producing SoTL requires fostering a culture of deep learning, and we will assist you in developing that culture.

Topics: SoTL, Research, POD Professional Development

Audience: All POD Members, New/recent faculty developers (5 years or less)

Half-day Pre-Conference Workshops

Thursday, November 10, 8:30 am–12:00 noon.

(Breakfast is not included with half-day workshops. All half-day workshops are $70)

W3—Classroom Assessment Reconsidered
  • Claire Howell Major, University of Alabama Tuscaloosa
  • Elizabeth Barkley, Foothill College

Many college teachers seek to create transformative learning experiences for students, but struggle with how to achieve this in ways that can also be efficiently and effectively assessed. We will share a new approach to course-based, teacher-driven classroom assessment called Learning Assessment Techniques (LATs) that braid teaching, active learning and assessment together to create a seamless, unified process. Participants will then explore 3 techniques in depth that have been carefully crafted to help students cultivate genuine connections within and beyond the classroom in ways that cross boundaries and result in deep, transformative learning.

Topics: Assessment, Faculty Professional Development, Teaching & Learning

Audience: All POD members, Faculty (conference attendees who are faculty and also part-time developers)

W4—Starting Out in Leadership Development: Sowing Seeds of Organizational Change
  • Deborah DeZure, Michigan State University
  • David Kiel, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Increasingly faculty developers are asked to provide leadership development for administrators and faculty. While faculty development theory, research and practice provide a strong base from which to move into leadership development, there are new challenges. This session will assist faculty developers to design, implement, and assess high quality programs of leadership development for their institutions. Drawing on theory and research on higher education leadership, leadership development, leadership pipelines, and organizational change, this program will identify key strategic decisions, program models, and resources to enable participants to design successful leadership development initiatives that align with their institutional needs and goals.

Topics: Organizational Development, Faculty Professional Development, Programs

Audience: Large colleges and universities, Administrators, Seasoned Educational Developers

W5—Transforming Toxic Relationships in Academe: Fostering a Culture of Collegiality
  • Elizabeth Roderick, University of Alaska Anchorage
  • Shawnalee Whitney, University of Alaska Anchorage
  • Loraleigh Keashly, Wayne State University

Toxic person-to-person interactions within academic departments seriously disrupt the possibilities for deeper learning for the higher education community and have substantial costs for institutions. Faculty development centers can lead in a revolutionary way by offering tools and resources to help transform departmental relationships and dynamics. Drawing from a wide range of research and university and societal sources, facilitators will offer an overview of toxic behavior in departments; tools and resources to address the issue; interactive training in bystander interventions; and help participants explore ways their centers can lay the groundwork for collegial cultures that support deep learning.

Topics: Faculty Professional Development, Diversity, Organizational Development

Audience: All POD members, Faculty (conference attendees who are faculty and also part-time developers), Administrators

W6—Consultation as Border Crossing: Shifting from Customer Service to Thought Partnerships
  • Jeff Nugent, Colgate University
  • Enoch Hale, Virginia Commonwealth University

This interactive workshop is designed to help participants think through the shift we are attempting to make in our work – and our identities – from “fixers” to “collaborators.” This requires changing how we approach our work as directors, as consultants, as technologists, along with the development of new skills and practices. This session provides a framework and two methods for cultivating transformative partnerships between faculty, center staff and administrators. Participants will contextualize the frameworks and strategies in this session and formulate initial plans for helping centers shift away from the more pervasive attitudes that perpetuate service-only stereotypes.

Topics: Faculty Professional Development, Teaching and Learning, Technology

Audience: New/recent faculty developers (5 years or less), Instructional Technologists and technology integration specialists

W7—Assignment Design Workshop: Best of the Transparency and NILOA Frameworks
  • Mary-Ann Winkelmes, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
  • Jilian Kinzie, Indiana University

This interactive workshop engages participants in sharing their own assignments and in promoting assignment design that benefits the learning of all students, especially underserved students. Best practices from two national projects will be implemented: the National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment (NILOA) and the Transparency in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education Project (TILT Higher Ed). This workshop is also a train-the-trainers session that includes active participation and metacognitive reflection, as well as a “how-to” manual. Participants will also have the opportunity to publish their assignments with commentary in NILOA’s online Assignment Library and join TILT Higher Ed’s implementation/research efforts.

Topics: Faculty Professional Development, Diversity, Retention

Audience: All POD members, institutions with large numbers of underserved students

W8—Managing Teams Using the CATME System: Practice Informed by Research
  • Misty L. Loughry, Georgia Southern University
  • Matthew W. Ohland, Purdue University
  • Daniel M. Ferguson, Purdue University
  • David J. Woehr, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

The workshop will introduce participants to free, web-based tools, for managing student teams. We review factors that instructors should consider when assigning students to teams and administering peer evaluations. Participants discuss their own experiences and practices, and we share relevant literature. We conduct interactive, hands-on, activities using the Team-Maker and CATME Peer Evaluation systems and demonstrate training tools that teach students to evaluate and rate teamwork behaviors accurately using a science-based model of teamwork. We help faculty understand how the tools support cooperative learning. Attendees with laptops, tablets, or smartphones will interact with the system in real-time.

Topics: Faculty Professional Development, Graduate Student Professional Development, Assessment

Audience: All POD Members

W9—Building a Social Media Presence for Centers and Educational Developers
  • Phillip M. Edwards, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • German E. Vargas Ramos, Otterbein University / University of MassachusettsAmherst
  • Bonnie B. Mullinix, Teaching, Learning and Technology Group (TLT Group)/Walden University
  • Bradford D. Wheeler, University of MassachusettsAmherst
  • Antonia Levy, CUNY School of Professional Studies
  • Olena Zhadko, New York Institute of Technology
  • Linda Bruenjes, Suffolk University
  • Raj Chaudhury, Auburn University

Social media use has propagated among educational developers and Centers of Teaching and Learning, accompanied by a corresponding increase in the number of POD sessions exploring this domain. This pre-conference workshop extends these conversations in a guided, practical format, challenging us to be more intentional, open, and empathetic in our social media outreach as we champion innovation in teaching and learning. Workshop activities are designed to help participants reflect on their investments in social media, develop strategies to augment their Center’s online presence, and engage other POD members through the various social media platforms currently used by our community.

Topics: POD Professional Development, Technology

Audience: All POD members, Administrators

W10—Connection Through the Transformative Power of Reflexivity
  • Samantha Clifford, Northern Arizona University

This highly interactive session will model a series of teaching activities to foster deep learning about how our individual identities (either knowingly or unknowingly) impact the relationships we form. Strategies will address how social identity perpetuates power and privilege. Deep learning will occur through reflexive activities, collaborative endeavors, and understanding the sedimented view and an analysis of our own responses. Participants will learn how to assist others to reframe how they perceive themselves in relation to the world and others. This workshop aims to help participants build deeper connections between students, faculty and administrators by placing value on person-to-person interactions.

Topics: Teaching & Learning, Diversity, Faculty Professional Development

Audience: All POD members, Faculty (conference attendees who are faculty and also part-time developers)

W11—Fostering Deeper Adjunct/Part-Time Socialization through Transforming Programming
  • Teresa Focarile, Boise State University
  • Lindsay Bernhagen,The Ohio State University
  • Lori Schroeder, Metropolitan State University
  • Steven Hansen, Duquesne University
  • Ann Coburn-Collins, Saginaw Valley State University
  • Eli Collins-Brown, Western Michigan University
  • Jim Stenerson, Pace University

Using the Delphi Project’s model, facilitators from the Adjunct and Part-Time Special Interest Group will walk participants through better understanding their adjuncts’ needs, sharing that understanding with stakeholders, and advocating for and offering strategies in response. Throughout the workshop, there will be ample opportunities for individual and group consultation to help participants develop an action plan that they can implement upon return to their own campuses. Facilitators and participants will explore a variety of programming options that serve to integrate adjuncts into a campus culture of teaching, such as face-to-face and online orientations, workshops, learning communities, and teaching excellence recognition.

Topics: Adjunct Professional Development, POD Professional Development, Organizational Development

Audience: All POD members, Administrators

W12—Designing Blended Courses and Educational Development: Research, Strategies and Resources
  • Traci Stromie, Kennesaw State University
  • Josie Baudier, Kennesaw State University
  • Katie E. Linder, Oregon State University

Blended learning leverages the best of two modalities to facilitate courses that combine face-to-face interaction with aligned online activities, often with a reduction in face-to-face classroom time.  Although this modality has been in use for several years, many educational developers need to learn more in order to best assist faculty with blended teaching experiences. In this intensive pre-conference workshop, participants will review research on blended learning, outline programming about or in the blended modality, explore technologies that support the blended modality, and brainstorm ways to expand faculty audiences through blended teaching and learning programs and services.

Topics: Programs, Organizational Development, Administration

Audience: All POD members, Instructional Technologists and technology integration specialists

W13—How’s It Going? Reflecting on Our Work
  • Kathryn D. Cunningham, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
  • Shaun Longstreet, Marquette University
  • Stephanie Rohdieck, The Ohio State University
  • Kevin Gannon, Grand View University
  • Kimberly Eby, George Mason University

Congratulations—you’re doing faculty development! What are the opportunities, challenges, and risks before you: reaching all constituents, budgeting, prioritizing, advocating, establishing your professional identity, evaluating your program, meeting increased demands?  “How’s it Going?” offers early and mid-career faculty developers an opportunity to consult with peers and experienced mentors. Prior to the session, participants submit an issue they face. The session provides a safe place to collaborate with colleagues in reflecting on their specific issues, and together, identifying strategies. The process helps professionals build a sense of efficacy as leaders and establish relationships with colleagues across the career spectrum.

Topics: Faculty Professional Development, Graduate Student Professional Development

Audience: New/recent faculty developers (5 years or less), mid-career faculty developers

W14—Identifying Your Pathway to Becoming a Strong Center Leader
  • Angela R. Linse, Pennsylvania State University (Penn State)
  • Taimi Olsen, University of Tennessee
  • Laurel Willingham-McLain, Duquesne University

Many teaching center directors lack management and leadership preparation for effectively leading a center. Experienced directors from three very different centers will facilitate an exploration of:

  1. diverse pathways to center leadership and the relevant skills and knowledge;
  2. center operations such as financial management, personnel, policies and procedures; and
  3. institutional contexts and strategic decision-making.

Participants will explore their pathways to leadership, self-assess their applicable knowledge and skills, and develop a specific plan for ongoing development. They will also receive practical tools and models to support day-to-day effectiveness.

Topics: POD Professional Development, Administration, Organizational Development, Center Director Development

Audience: Seasoned faculty developers, New or aspiring center directors

W15—Taking Flight: Opening (or Revitalizing) a New Center for Teaching and Learning
  • Cher C. Hendricks, University of West Georgia
  • Laura Cruz, Tennessee Technological University

Whether you are opening a new Center or revitalizing your current Center, this highly interactive, hands-on workshop will provide an opportunity to work with experienced coaches to develop short- and long-term plans to help your CTL be successful. The workshop begins with activities to help participants identify resources, institutional priorities, challenges, and opportunities. Coaches will then share strategies conducting a needs assessment, building networks, setting the Center’s goals and priorities, and cultivating a campus culture that supports excellence in teaching and learning. Working with colleagues and coaches from similar institution types, participants will create action plans to achieve their goals.

Topics: Start-up

Audience: New/recent faculty developers (5 years or less), Small colleges and universities, Large colleges and universities

W16: Confronting Microagressions with Microresistance and Ally Development
  • Cynthia Ganote, Saint Mary’s College of California
  • Floyd Cheung, Smith College
  • Tasha Souza, Boise State University

We often discuss ways to lead difficult dialogues amongst our students, and even ways to serve as allies to students experiencing classroom-based microaggressions. However, what do we do when we witness colleagues who are the targets of microaggressions? This pre-conference workshop will examine ways in which microaggressions particularly impact women of all races and ethnicities, faculty and staff of color, and LGBT faculty and staff in academia. In response, we can use constructive tools to serve as allies to our colleagues. This focus on empowerment allows us to take action in our local environments, thereby lessening the impact upon colleagues when microaggressions occur.

Topics: Diversity, Administration, POD Network Professional Development

Audience: All POD Network members, Administrators

W17: Confronting the Racial Reality: Supporting Faculty of Color
  • Cheryl Richardson, University of Delaware
  • Cameron Harris, George Mason University

In this session, presenters will introduce literature that describes the experiences of underrepresented faculty and educational developers on college and university campuses. Participants will be guided through practices for advocacy towards equity and social justice, while engaging in self-care. Attendees will be encouraged to reflect on personal experiences supporting peers in educational environments. The focus of this session will be on practical application of support mechanisms, and what faculty development can do to support our educational quest for inclusion.

Topics: Diversity; Faculty Professional Development

Audience: Seasoned Faculty Developers, Faculty


CONCURRENT SESSIONS

A full schedule of concurrent sessions will be available here in late summer 2016.

  • 75-minute interactive sessions: Co-chairs Sal Meyers (sal.meyers@simpson.edu) and Julie A. Sievers (julies@stedwards.edu).  Interactive sessions combine brief presentations or panel discussions with methods that engage all participants, reflecting POD’s long-standing tradition of interactive, collegial sessions.
  • 75-minute roundtable discussions: Co-chairs Lisa Kurz (Kurz@indiana.edu) and Steven Jones (steven.jones@gcsu.edu). Roundtable discussions provide an opportunity for various kinds of interactions in a smaller group setting (10–15 people), such as discussion of a concept, approach, program, issue, case study, or reading.
  • 35-minute research presentations: Co-chairs Mary-Ann Winkelmes (Mary-Ann.Winkelmes@unlv.edu) and Michael Sweet (m.sweet@neu.edu). Research sessions include a presentation and discussion of new or ongoing educational, professional, or organizational development research. Session leaders present their original research for the first 20–25 minutes, reserving 10–15 minutes for Q&A.
  • Poster Sessions: Co-chairs Bill Rando (williamrando@uchicago.edu) and Kathy Jackson (klj11@psu.edu). The poster session provides an ideal format for presenting in a context where colleagues can engage in many one-on-one discussions, facilitated by well-designed posters, as well as supplemental materials.

Concurrent sessions may address one or more of the topics and audiences below. Topic and audience designations will be listed in the program.

Topics:
  • Adjunct Professional Development: Practices, processes, theories, techniques, programs pertaining specifically to adjunct or part-time faculty development.
  • Administration: Budgeting, funding, management, planning, performance appraisal, staff/faculty recruitment and retention, and other issues concerning the administration of a center or other unit.
  • Assessment: Measuring the effectiveness of an aspect of practice and/or outcomes in order to improve (designate other topics to indicate the subject of assessment—e.g., teaching & learning, programs, Faculty PD).
  • Diversity: addressing under-represented or minority populations on campus, in the classroom, in administration.
  • Faculty Professional Development: Practices, processes, theories, techniques, programs pertaining to faculty development.
  • Graduate Student Professional Development: Practices, processes, theories, techniques, programs pertaining specifically to graduate and professional student development.
  • Organizational Development: Practices, processes, theories, or techniques related to the systemic development of institutions and organizations.
  • POD Professional Development: Practices, processes, theories, techniques, programs pertaining to development of those in the professions represented by POD (e.g., Center staff, technologists, etc.).
  • Programs: Organization, implementation, practices, theories, techniques related to programs and services (in centers and other units).
  • Research: Systematic, generalizable investigations into clearly defined questions, employing accepted methods for data collection and analysis (designate other topics to indicate the subject of research—e.g., teaching & learning, programs, Faculty PD).
  • Retention: Practices, processes, theories, techniques related to retaining students and improving graduation rates.
  • SoTL: Practice of, results of, and programs supporting Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.
  • Start-up: Practices, processes, organizational ideas related to establishment and growth of centers, programs, or other projects.
  • Sustainability: incorporating applying principles of environmental and/or programmatic sustainability into educational development work.
  • Teaching & Learning: Practices, processes, theories, techniques related to classroom and other teaching and learning.
  • Technology: Explorations of current and new technologies that can support teaching, program or organizational development.
Audiences:
  • Administrators
  • All POD Network members
  • Community colleges
  • Faculty (conference attendees who are faculty and also part-time developers)
  • Graduate teaching assistants or those supporting this population
  • Historically black colleges and universities
  • International POD participants
  • Instructional technologists and technology integration specialists
  • Large colleges and universities
  • New/recent educational developers (5 years or less)
  • Seasoned educational developers
  • Small colleges and universities
  • Other (please specify)

SPECIAL SESSIONS: POD-SPONSORED, SUNDAY ANCHOR

In addition to the standard pre-conference workshops, 75-minute sessions, 35-minute sessions, and poster sessions, the POD conference includes POD-sponsored sessions and an anchor session to close the event. POD-sponsored sessions are sponsored and submitted by members of various POD committees, then reviewed and vetted by POD’s Core Committee. The Anchor Session, a blind-reviewed accepted session that has particular importance and/or broad interest to POD Network membership, is chosen by the Conference Committee.

This year’s Anchor Session, “Teaching Across Cultural Strengths in Transformative Relationship,” will be held on Sunday morning, 8:45–10:15 am. Alicia Fedelina Chavez (University of New Mexico) and Susan Diana Longerbeam (Northern Arizona University)  will introduce a model of Cultural Frameworks of Teaching and Learning and will include interactive and introspective activities to work in transformative relationship with self, colleagues, and students to reflect on how personal cultural norms, values, assumptions, and beliefs play in college courses and develop a greater balance of teaching across cultural strengths.

Alicia Fedelina Chávez

Alicia Fedelina Chavez
Alicia Fedelina Chávez, Ph.D., is Associate Professor in Teacher Education, Educational Leadership and Policy at the University of New Mexico. She served as a collegiate leader, student affairs professional, and faculty member in universities around the country, including serving as the senior executive officer for a campus in Northern New Mexico, serving as Dean of Students at the University of Wisconsin—Madison, and serving as Diversity Development Officer at Iowa State University. She holds a Ph.D. in Higher Education—Policy Studies from the University of Arizona, a master’s degree in Student Affairs/Higher Education Administration from Iowa State University, and a bachelor’s degree in psychology from New Mexico State University. She regularly works with faculty, student affairs professionals, and central administrators in the area of transforming colleges and universities to more effectively teach and serve diverse populations. Her current consulting, faculty development, leadership development, teaching, and scholarship are centered in facilitating understanding and balance between cultural epistemologies and ways of being in professional practice. She works from a belief that higher education institutions and societies benefit from garnering the strengths of many Peoples, cultures, and nations.

Dr. Chávez’s scholarship focuses in areas of culture and college teaching as well as identity and collegiate leadership. Her publications include two coauthored books on culture and college teaching, Teaching Across Cultural Strengths (Stylus, 2016) and Web Based Teaching Across Culture and Age (Springer, 2013), as well as two coedited books on identity and leadership in higher education, Identity & Leadership: Informing Our Lives, Informing Our Practice (NASPA, 2013) and Indigenous Leadership in Higher Education (Routledge, 2015). Her academic journal articles include “Clan, Sage, and Sky: Indigenous, Hispano and Mestizo Narratives of Learning in New Mexico Context”; “Toward a Multicultural Ecology of Teaching and Learning”; “Leading in the Borderlands: Negotiating Ethnic Patriarchy for the Benefit of Students”; “Spirit of Place: Crafting a College in Northern New Mexico Rhythm”; “Spirit and Nature: Reflections of a Mestiza in Higher Education”; and “Learning to Value the ‘Other’: A Model of Diversity Development.”

Susan Diana Longerbeam

Susan Diana Longerbeam
Susan Diana Longerbeam, Ph.D., is Associate Professor in Educational Psychology at Northern Arizona University, where she leads a graduate student affairs program. She served as a university health services director and interim dean of students at Oregon State University, and she holds a Ph.D. in College Student Personnel from the University of Maryland, a master’s degree in Health Services Administration from Antioch University, and a bachelor’s degree in Community Studies from the University of California, Santa Cruz. She served on the ACPA Commission on Professional Preparation and the NASPA Faculty Fellows and Council.

Dr. Longerbeam’s scholarship focuses on culture and college teaching, campus climate, and student success in higher education. Her publications include a coauthored book on culture and college teaching, Teaching Across Cultural Strengths (Stylus, 2016). Recent journal articles include “We Cannot Reach Them”: Chinese Undergraduate Student Perceptions of the U.S. Campus Climate” (2013); “Putting Old Tensions to Rest: Integrating Multicultural Education and Global Learning to Advance Student Development” (2013); “Developing Openness to Diversity in Living-Learning Program Participants” (2010); and “Contemporary College Contexts: College Environments for Student Learning and Retention at a Southwestern U.S. University” (2010); and reflective work: “Encounters with Angels: A Struggle to Return Home from Study Abroad” (2015); “One Journey of Compassion: My Search for Inspiriting Leadership (2013); “‘You Home? Meet Me on the Stairway’: Lessons of Living Together” (2009).


POD UNCONFERENCE

Co-chairs Patty Payette (patty.payette@louisville.edu), Diane Boyd (deb0020@auburn.edu), and Nick Yates (nicholas.yates@zu.ac.ae). POD Unconference (POD-U) provides conference participants with opportunities to engage in peer-to-peer learning, collaborative activities, and creative experiences. POD-U is about YOU, the conference participant! Similar to unconferences held at other events, POD-U is a largely participant-driven track, allowing you to decide what topics and discussions take place. These just-in-time learning experiences are an excellent opportunity for you to share what you know or to learn about something new. In addition to sessions planned and facilitated by conference participants, we have organized several sessions for you to share resources and to engage in conversations with experienced faculty developers and POD committee members.

POD-U SESSIONS

POD-U sessions, offered throughout the conference, are participant-driven events. These sessions are ideal for discussing challenges you are facing at your institution, sharing resources you have developed, discussing ideas or issues that emerge during the conference, solving a problem, developing new resources, sharing a personal talent, or simply meeting others with similar (and diverse!) interests. In addition to the events to the events below, look for other POD U interactive sessions identified throughout the program.

Ready, Set, Collaborate!

Friday, November 11, 3:45–5:00 pm in Grand Ballroom C

This is crowdsourcing at its best for us faculty developers and our our peskiest problems! Show up ready to share your knottiest or most persistent problem in your educational development. You will pair up and reflect, write and connect with others to distill and share a list of your most compelling work-related problems. Be prepared to review the larger group list and in order to vote and then work with others on the challenges you want to tackle. Smaller groups will coalesce around the top issues and and then be given some tools and a time limit to brainstorm solutions to those “hot spots”. Be ready to collaborate, come up with brilliant solutions, and then share them concisely and creatively with the larger group.

Not Your Normal Poster Session

Saturday, November 12, 3:00–4:15 pm in Grand Ballroom C.

This unconference session invites you to spontaneously collaborate with other participants session to identify, organize, and present a paper or digital poster on a hot topic in teaching and learning—all within the timeframe of the session. The trick is to define the topic, ground your ideas in the research, evidence, and personal best practices, and then come up with a creative way to share your ideas for advancing conversation on the topic. Participants will shape an approach to that topic that is poster-worthy, bringing together recommendations drawn from professional experience and/or the scholarship to support relevant findings and approaches.  The session will conclude with a gallery walk (in person and digitally, using padlet) so participants can both learn in the moment and return to the posters after the conference while also networking over shared interests with colleagues during and after the session. Collaboration, creativity and citations are all a must!


BIRDS OF A FEATHER

Birds of a Feather (BoFs) sessions are informal conversations designed to foster relationships between experienced faculty developers and colleagues new to the field, and are intended to promote more meaningful interaction and deeper relationships than can sometimes occur during regular conference sessions. Each BoFs session is facilitated by an experienced faculty developer with expertise in a particular topic. All sessions take place on Friday from 7:30–8:45 AM. More information on specific BOFs will be available summer 2016, as well as in the Conference Program. Please contact BOF coordinators for more information: Jody Horn, (Jhorn9@uco.edu) and Stephanie Rohdieck (rohdieck.1@osu.edu).


EARN DIGITAL BADGES IN LOUISVILLE!

POD Network 2016 Learner Badge  POD Network 2016 Presenter Badge

All attendees at the 2016 POD Network Conference will be eligible to earn a “Learner” badge; presenters can also earn a “Presenter” badge. The POD Network’s Special Interest Group on Teaching with Technology (SIG­TwT) is organizing this as a way for attendees to have a meaningful experience with an emerging technology. We also hope to stimulate discussion about digital badges in educational development. Let a badge be your incentive to dig deeply into ideas you encounter at the conference!

Here’s how it will work:

  1. Get the details.
    Learn about the program; you don’t get a badge for just showing up.
  2. Complete the requirements.
    To show what you learned, create an artifact and write a reflection.
  3. Submit the evidence.
    If your work meets the requirements you’ll get a badge claim ticket.
  4. Share the badge.
    Claim and display it on LinkedIn, Facebook, or a professional website.

These badges will be:

  • User­friendly ­ easy to sign up, post evidence, and request a badge.
  • Open ­ it’s not a contest; any attendee who meets the criteria can earn the badge.
  • Compatible ­ with Credly.com as the back end, badges are transportable.

Complete information will be posted on the POD Network website and included in conference
packets—it will also be available through the mobile app.


CONFERENCE BUDDY PROGRAM

Deadline, October 24, 2016
The Conference Buddy program is designed to connect you with other attendees familiar with the ins and outs of the conference. After signing up you will be matched with your conference buddy. You are encouraged to connect (via email/phone) prior to the conference and arrange a few times to meet during the conference: during coffee breaks, lunches, receptions, dinners, or at educational expeditions. Things you might talk about include what sessions to attend, not-to-be-missed conference events, ways to get involved in POD. The earlier and more often you connect, the better. Upon enrollment, you will receive an email with your buddy match.

sign-up now

 


THE DOCTOR IS IN

Friday, November 11, 3:45–5:15 pm
In this session, participants have an opportunity to work individually and informally with members of the POD Research Committee and Grants Committee to discuss issues related to conducting educational research, Scholarship of Teaching and Learning research, or writing a competitive POD Network grant proposal.  Research discussed can be of various kinds, quantitative as well as qualitative, related to teaching, learning, assessment, evaluation, and professional, organizational, or instructional development. This session takes place with the poster sessions on Friday from 3:45–5:15 pm.


CAREER FAIR

The Career Fair will be held on Friday morning from 9:00–10:15 am. This session should be considered a networking “meet and greet” opportunity, not a time for formal interviews. Job candidates are likely to have more success if they meet face-to-face with potential employers rather than just dropping off a resume; the time can then be used to learn more about the position and the employing institution. Potential employers can use this time to plan a subsequent interview during the conference. More information will be distributed to POD members and conference registrants in the early fall by Job Fair coordinator Kaury Kucera (kaury.kucera@gmail.com).


COMMITTEE/SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP OUTREACH SESSION

New in 2016! POD committees and Special Interest Groups are invited to participate in an Outreach Session to be held during the Resource Fair on Friday evening from 5:00–6:45 pm.  This session is intended to give POD conference participants a chance to learn about the mission and initiatives of these committees and groups in order to make an informed decision about how the would like to get involved in POD.

 

GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL STUDENT DEVELOPERS NETWORKING LUNCH AND COMMITTEE MEETING

A Graduate and Professional Student Development (GPSD) Networking Lunch will be held on Thursday, 12:00–1:00 pm. This event provides an opportunity for graduate students, postdoctoral scholars, and those engaged in graduate and professional student development to connect with each other early in the POD Conference. Graduate & Professional Student Developers are also welcome to attend. GPSD subcommittee chairs will be in attendance to provide conference and job market mentorship.

The GPSD Committee will meet Saturday, 9:00–10:15 am. All Graduate & Professional Student Developers are welcome to attend as we discuss directions, issues, and activities for the group and for the committee.

A note for past POD conference attendees: the GPSD committee meeting will no longer take place during breakfast.


RESOURCE FAIR

The Resource Fair provides a venue for you to find or exchange information and resources relevant to our work as organizational developers. This is a great opportunity to socialize while acquiring new information or by sharing activities, resources, and services that benefit the POD community. The Resource Fair features tables only from college- and university-affiliated programs and from non-profit organizations. The Resource Fair and Reception will be held on Friday evening from 5:15–6:45 pm. Materials and services may NOT be offered for sale or promoted for sale during the Resource Fair.

Note: If you wish to have a table at the Resource Fair, you must register for the conference and reserve your table in advance by checking the appropriate box on the conference registration form. You or your representative should plan to be at your table to talk with conference participants during the entire session. There is no fee. More information about the Resource Fair will be distributed in the early fall to those who have reserved a table by Resource Fair coordinator Ruth Poproski, ruth.poproski@gatech.edu.


VENDOR EXHIBIT

The Vendor Exhibit will be held all day (roughly 8AM to 5PM) on Thursday, Friday and Saturday. The Vendor Exhibit and Vendor Workshops (see below) are the only times at the conference when items or services may be promoted or offered for sale. We welcome publishers, consultants, and others. If you wish to purchase a table at this event, you must reserve your place in advance by checking the appropriate box on the conference registration form.

Individual (3 days): $150 (for a self-employed person)

Individual (2 days): $100 (for a self-employed person)

Corporate (3 days only): $400 (for businesses/corporations)


VENDOR INTERACTIVE WORKSHOPS

Vendors who have sponsored the POD conference at the Bronze Level or higher have the opportunity to present a 75 minute interactive workshop. Interactive workshops are not strictly commercials; rather, they are intended to reflect the engaged and research-based approach of the POD community. The Vendor Exhibit and Vendor Workshops are the only times at the conference when items or services may be promoted or offered for sale.

If you wish to be a sponsor at the Bronze Level or higher, contact the main office at podoffice@podnetwork.org before August 15.


LOUISVILLE EXCURSIONS

To pay for excursions separately or to add a spouse or friend, send an email with full details to: <podoffice@podnetwork.org>.

 

DATE
AFTERNOON
EVENING
Wednesday, November 9 5:00–7:00 pm
NuLu Foodie Excursion
SOLD OUT
Thursday, November 10
Friday, November 11 12:30–5:00 pm
Art & Science of Learning
12:30–5:00 pm
Churchill Downs Fall Meet
Saturday, November 12 3:00–5:00 pm
Downtown Arts Excursion
6:30–9:00 pm
Spirit of Jefferson Dinner Cruise
SOLD OUT
Sunday, November 13 11:00 am–2:30 pm
Baseball and Bourbon

NuLu Foodie Excursion SOLD OUT
Nulu Foodie Excursion
Nulu Foodie Excursion

Get introduced to award-winning Louisville food culture in the most delicious way possible! With diverse options like brisket, chicken, pulled pork, smoked tofu, sweet potato fries, mac and cheese, baked beans, collard greens and more, everyone will find something to love at Feast BBQ. Don’t miss the fried pickles! Afterwards, you can either return to the Galt House or pay a visit to Akasha Brewing, Louisville Beer Store, and other nearby NuLu destinations

  • Date: Wednesday, November 9
  • Cost: $25
  • Time: 4:30 pm departure, gather at Feast BBQ at 5:00 pm, return to Galt House at 7:00 pm
  • Included: Will get voucher for set amount of money for dinner/drinks at Feast. Anything over cost will be responsibility of attendee. For the optional destinations, visitors will be on their own
  • # of People: 10 minimum, 25 maximum
  • Transportation: Zero bus from Galt House and back. Zero bus stops running at 7:00 pm. Anyone staying after 7:00 pm will need to get back to Galt House on their own. (1.4 mile walk, estimated 28-minute walk. Cab ride would be less than 5 minutes.)
  • Feast BBQ: http://www.feastbbq.com/

Churchill Downs Racetrack Fall Meet
Churchill Downs Fall Meet

Experience the exciting and colorful spectacle of thoroughbred racing at legendary Churchill Downs. Stroll through the popular Derby museum, visit its historic grounds, and enjoy the ambiance of one of the most hallowed shrines in American sports. The Fall Meet is in session and the betting windows are open! Good luck!

  • Date: Friday, November 11
  • Cost: $75 a person for 25–34 people. Includes entry into the Derby Museum, lunch at the café, general admission to the track and transportation via mid-size coach.
  • Time: 12:30 pm departure, lunch at track 1:00 pm, return to Galt House at 5:00 pm
  • Included: lunch, museum tour, optional walking tour of track, general admission to races and transportation
  • # of People: 35 or more for reduced cost
  • Transportation: door to door, coach service
  • URL: https://www.churchilldowns.com/visit/

Art & Science of Learning
Art & Science of Learning
Art & Science of Learning

Take a break from the conference and get to know more about what’s happening at the University of Louisville! Join us for a guided tour of the University of Louisville’s newly opened Technology Innovation and Learning Laboratory (TILL) and existing Delphi Center for Teaching and Learning, followed by a self-guided tour of the adjacent nationally recognized Speed Art Museum. The museum has been recently renovated and dramatically expanded for your viewing pleasure (café on site).

  • Date: Friday, November 11
  • Cost: $49 a person includes museum admission and transportation for 25–34 people ($39/each for 35 people), lunch on your own (café on site)
  • Time: 12:30 pm departure, return to Galt House at 5:00 pm
  • Included: UofL TILL tour, admission to Speed Art Museum and transportation
  • # of People: 35 or more for reduced cost
  • Transportation: door to door, coach service
  • Speed Museum: http://www.speedmuseum.org/
  • Delphi Center: http://louisville.edu/delphi/

Artist rendering of new Technology Innovation and Learning Laboratory (TILL) at the University of Louisville

Downtown Arts Excursion: Tour of Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft /21C Museum
Art Excursion
Art Excursion

Take a break to soak up some downtown culture! Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft honors Kentucky’s rich heritage of art and culture while looking forward to the future of the arts in the region. 21C Museum Hotel is a destination boutique hotel that combines cutting edge art and luxury with an art museum open around the clock! After visiting 21c, stay for a memorable dinner or a drink at the award-winning Proof on Main. (Reservations recommended.)

  • Date: Saturday, November 12
  • Cost: FREE!
  • Optional dinner or drink at Proof on Main.
  • Time: Gather at KMAC at 3:00 pm. Walk over to 21c at 4:00 pm. End for optional dinner at 5:00 pm at Proof
  • Included: Guided tours of KMAC and 21c, optional dinner at Proof
  • # of People: 20–25 on museum tours, Proof will need to be limited to a smaller number of people
  • Transportation: Walk- 0.4 (8-minute walk) from Galt House to KMAC/21C
  • 21c: http://www.21cmuseumhotels.com/louisville/
  • Proof: http://www.proofonmain.com/
  • KMAC: http://www.kmacmuseum.org/

Spirit of Jefferson Dinner Cruise SOLD OUT 
Spirit of Jefferson Dinner Cruise

Go back in time for a two-and-a-half hour river cruise and dinner aboard the Spirit of Jefferson. The Spirit has the look and feel of an old-time steamboat, with the modern conveniences of heat, air conditioning, and open, full views of the scenic river and shore. Join us as we create wonderful memories along the Ohio river, and see for yourself!

  • Date: Saturday, November 12
  • Cost: $42 a person
  • Time: Gather at 6:15 pm and walk over. Boat boards at 6:30 pm. Boat departs at 7:00 pm, 9:00 pm return.
  • Included: Dinner buffet and cruise
  • # of people: 45 Maximum
  • Transportation: Walk to dock (0.2 miles, 4-minute walk)
  • Spirit of Jefferson: http://www.belleoflouisville.org/the-spirit-of-jefferson.html

Baseball and Bourbon: Tours of the Louisville Slugger Museum and the Evan Williams Experience
Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory
Baseball and Bourbon

Experience firsthand two of Louisville’s Claims to Fame! You’ll start by visiting the Louisville Slugger Museum, home of the World’s Biggest Baseball Bat. The museum offers interactive and interesting exhibits along with a bat factory tour and batting cages. Visitors to the Louisville Slugger Museum receive a free mini wooden souvenir bat. After you visit the museum, you’ll walk to the Evan Williams Bourbon Experience where a guided tour will feature an operating artisanal distillery. You will not only learn the process for making bourbon, but you will see it being made right before your eyes. The tour also includes premium bourbon tastings and concludes in the retail shop where you can take home an array of signature items, including a personalized bottle of Evan Williams.

  • Date: Sunday, November 13
  • Cost: $26 total ($14 for Slugger Museum, $12 for Evan Williams Experience)
  • Time: 11:00 am gather. Walk over to Slugger Museum for tour. (Tours begin every 20 minutes.) Evan Williams tour begins at 1:20 pm. Tour will end by 2:30 pm
  • Included: Slugger Museum tour and mini-bat, Evan Williams Experience—Tour and bourbon tasting
  • # of people: Up to 20
  • Transportation: Walk- 0.5 (10-minute walk) from Galt House to Slugger Museum
  • Slugger Museum: http://www.sluggermuseum.com/
  • Evan Williams Experience: http://evanwilliams.com/visit.php
 Excursion Resources

POD MEMBERSHIP DUES

(in U.S. dollars)

Individual membership  $115 per person
Institutional Membership (when three or more join/renew from same inst.) $95 per person
Student or Retired  $65 per person

CONFERENCE REGISTRATION FEES

Conference registration fees do not include membership dues. If you would like to register at the lower, POD Network member rate, you must already be a member or you must renew or join before you register for the conference.

MEMBER REGISTRATION

NON-MEMBER REGISTRATION

 

 

All fees, outlined below, are in U.S. dollars and payment must be made in U.S. dollars.

  • Please note that the conference registration fee includes the designated conference meals, coffee breaks, and receptions. Registration includes three breakfasts (Friday, Saturday, Sunday), two dinners (Thursday and Friday) and one lunch (Saturday).
  • Pre-conference workshops, educational excursions, and tables at the vendor exhibit have additional fees and must be selected when you register.

Refund Policy: A full refund, minus $25 processing fee, will be made if cancellation is received by October 1, 2016. A $75 cancellation fee will be retained for cancellations received from October 2–15, 2016. Other than in the case of personal emergency, no refunds can be made after October 15, 2016. Substitutions in attendees may be made at any time. Because of transportation scheduling and contracts, refunds for excursions will be honored only if you cancel your entire conference registration before October 1.

CONFERENCE FEES Early Bird
Registration Fee 
(Postmarked or submitted online
through October 9; deadline strictly observed)
Post Early Bird
Registration Fee 
(Postmarked or submitted online from October 10 through November 5)
On-site Registration Fee

(On or after November 6)

Member $495 $555 $585
Non-member $645 $705 $735
Student (member) $325 $365 $385
Student (non-member) $485 $545 $565
Retired (member) $325 $365 $385
Retired (non-member) $485 $545 $565
One Day Only (member;
includes meal(s))
$230 $260 $320
One Day Only (non-member;
includes meal(s))
$325 $365 $415
Meals only for attendee’s guest
(for entire conference). Membership
is not required for meals only. Two dinners, one lunch, three breakfasts.
$325 $350 $350

HOTEL RESERVATIONS

Galt House Hotel

Address: 140 N 4th St, Louisville, KY 40202

Rates

$145 / night: Rivue Tower (Deluxe Guestroom: standard hotel room)
$165 / night: Suite Tower (Executive Suite: standard room with small parlor and couch, mini-fridge, wet bar)

Room examples here: http://www.galthouse.com/stay/

Rates are guaranteed until October 15, 2016 or until reserved block sells out. Reserve early to guarantee a room! Suite Tower rooms are limited.

For reservations phone: (502) 589-5200 or 1-800-The-Galt

Reservation link (Select “Attendee” under Guest Type Drop-Down):   https://resweb.passkey.com/go/POD16

  • All conference participants will have free access to the hotel gym (guests usually charged $15/day).
  • There will be free wifi access in all hotel guest rooms.

TRANSPORTATION

The nearest airport to the Galt Hotel is Louisville International Airport.

Louisville International Airport
600 Terminal Drive
Louisville, KY 40209
(502) 367-4636

Airport Transportation

Galt House Hotel has arranged airport transportation with your reservation via Sandollar Limousine. To take advantage of this service you can go directly to their website, www.sandollarlimo.com or www.galthouseshuttle.com to give your flight information and details. Payment can be attached to room billing.

  • $15 one-way per person
  • $25 round-trip person
  • Arrange your departing trip at the transportation desk directly at 502-561-4022
  • Operation hours: 7:00 am to 8:00 pm, will accommodate early or late arrivals by making arrangements
Cabs

Cost to airport from the Galt House Hotel is approximately $18

Zero Bus

The Zero covers a large area of downtown Louisville and gives easy access to many local attractions with the convenience of boarding in front of the hotel.

  • Free
  • Operation hours: Monday–Saturday, 7:30 am–11:00 pm
TARC

TARC is the local bus system. It is inexpensive to ride and pick-up is a block from the hotel.

Driving Directions

From Louisville International Airport (8.8 miles)—Take I-65 N to N 3rd St. Take exit 5B from I-64W. Continue onto N 3rd St. Drive to N 4th St.

Hotel Parking

Galt House Hotel has 3,200 on-site parking spaces available in our attached covered parking garage for our guests. The current charge is $15 per night. Valet parking is offered for $25 per night. Complimentary coach parking is available for tours and conventions.

Height requirements for our garages are 6’4″ for The Suite Tower and 6’8″ for The Rivue Tower. Buses or any other vehicles that are taller than the limit, are to check-in with valet and will be directed to special lots. All vehicles can be accommodated in the CITY RUN parking structure.


SHIPPING INFORMATION

The Galt House Hotel will only accept pre-paid packages. All packages must contain a label with the following information:

  1. Return address
  2. Addressed to:YOUR NAME HERE W/ DATE OF STAY
    140 N. 4th St.
    Louisville, KY 40202

All packages should be sent to arrive no earlier than October 27, 2016.

The following per-unit receiving fees apply (to be paid by the shipper or person picking up the package):

  • Under 10 lbs: $7
  • 11–21 lbs: $10
  • 22–30 lbs: $15
  • 31–45 lbs: $20
  • 46–60 lbs: $25
  • 61–100 lbs: $45
  • 101 lbs and up: $65

Click here for DRAFT of 2016 conference program (still subject to change)

Transformative Relationships: Fostering Cultures of Deep Learning

INVITATION TO ATTEND

We cordially invite you to participate in the POD Network’s 41st Annual Conference to be held in Louisville, Kentucky at the Galt House Hotel on November 9–13, 2016.

Our conference theme is Transformative Relationships: Fostering Cultures of Deep Learning. We hope that this theme will inspire us to consider the ways that our work impacts change on a broader level through the relationships that we forge within our communities of teaching and learning. After critical reflection during the POD Network’s 40th anniversary where we looked inward about our own practices, we now turn to look outward to consider the types of relationships that would help us to expand our impact and engage in Paolo Freire’s vision of dialogic leadership.

“…to fail to think with the people is a sure way to cease being revolutionary leaders.”
—Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed

Inspired by Freire’s charge, we hope to invite educational developers to explore how to build deeper connections within our institutions and larger societies. How can these personal connections be seen as gateways to transforming our own professional practices and values, encouraging deep learning for our students and strengthening educational and organizational development missions on micro, meso, and macro-levels? Intentional focus on transformative relationships challenges us to take a direct look at the importance of person-to-person interactions. It calls for a shift from focusing only on outcomes and results to emphasizing genuine connections and shared growth. It calls us to go beyond the status quo and to dream of new opportunities to improve the quality of higher education—together. How do you and the people you work with relate to each other? How might learning be deepened by strengthening relationships?

We need to work together with our students, colleagues, partners, allies, mentors, and kindred spirits within and outside the institutions where we work in order to cultivate this type of community-engaged learning in the classroom and beyond. Through these relationships we can work towards fostering cultures of deep learning on a broader level. These collaborations may allow us to think beyond the status quo and challenge us to take action towards our shared vision of higher education.

In order to work more intentionally with our communities towards fostering cultures of deep learning, we offer up the following questions for consideration:

  • What opportunities do we as educational developers have in engaging the beliefs of students, faculty, administrators and public policy makers about the values and benefits of deep learning?
  • How can we support and encourage partnering with students in the enterprise of deep learning?
  • What might students, faculty, administrators and public policy makers think about how closely our current practices do the work of deep learning?

Thinking about deep learning at a cultural level also helps us consider how we need bigger structures to support and enable those practices.

  • In what ways is fostering deep learning rewarded in our institutions?
  • How is deep learning captured in the way that our institutions and policy makers measure success and then supported in key decisions about funding, human resources, tools, and facilities?
  • How might we mobilize the “O” in POD and engage with the organizational focus of our profession to think at a structural level?
  • How can we ensure strong links between everyday practices in the classroom and the mission of the institution?
  • How can we broker engagement between the grassroots communities and top level leadership to encourage transformation organically?
  • How do we lay the groundwork for transforming paradigms, cultures, and structures?
  • How can we keep relationships going strong even through the difficult moments of implementing change, such as a curriculum redesign?

Thinking about collaborations in academic contexts might also lead us to think about the way we structure the production of knowledge in our institutions.

  • Are we siloed within our disciplinary and hierarchical roles?
  • Do we have language and practices that could allow us to foster connections across these traditional boundaries?
  • What of the boundaries between institutions of higher education, policy makers and the public in general?
  • How might a culture of deep learning help us forge relationships that work on the tension that often exists at these boundaries? (What are the tensions that have traditionally kept us from engaging in transformative relationships across boundaries?)
  • How can we engage with the various motivations that students and faculty bring to courses when creating learning experiences at different institutions?

Thinking about the potential for technology to enhance and provide new opportunities for learning might lead us to consider the ways that we can utilize and develop tools to expand collaboration and access to education.

  • How do we encourage faculty and graduate students to leverage technology to create spaces to learn and collaborate in ways that we haven’t learned before?
  • How can educational developers collaborate with teachers and students to envision ways technology can be used to decrease learning barriers?
  • How might educational developers participate in institutional decision making about how to employ technology to expand access to higher education?
  • How might educational developers use technology to mediate encounters between students and communities in order to generate opportunities for understanding and mutually envisioned innovation?

Finally, thinking about the ways we express the value of deep learning may open up space to re-imagine traditional approaches to assessment of student learning, curricula, programs, and institutions as well as our own work as educational developers.

  • How well do current approaches to assessment of student learning and curricular effectiveness capture deep learning?
  • How can we imagine approaches to assessment that are sufficiently individualized to capture depth but sufficiently standardized to be manageable and sustainable?
  • How might we work across the boundaries between institutions of higher education and communities, industries, and government to develop assessment methods that measure student learning by real world standards?
  • How can we engage our communities in assessing the effectiveness of our educational development practices?
  • If we define excellence in educational development practices in part by the extent to which we engage in collaborative engagement with our communities, how might that transform our approaches to educational development?

Just as the fabric of any culture is comprised of the connections between its threads, so too must a culture of deep learning bring all of these partners and their perspectives together in order to achieve a transformative impact. Please plan to join us to engage in transformative dialogues.

Carl S. Moore, Conference Co-Chair carlsmoore.phd@gmail.com
Carol Subiño Sullivan, Conference Co-Chair csubino@cetl.gatech.edu
Lynn Eaton, Program Co-Chair leaton@umhb.edu
Greg Siering, Program Co-Chair gsiering@indiana.edu
Hoag Holmgren, POD Network Executive Director podoffice@podnetwork.org

OVERVIEW OF THE POD NETWORK AND ITS MISSION

The POD Network

The POD Network supports a network of over 1,100 members who have an interest in educational and organizational development. While POD members come primarily from the USA and Canada, the membership also represents 20 other countries. Through its members, the POD Network leads and supports change for the improvement of higher education through faculty, instructional, and organizational development.

The POD Network seeks to promote the scholarship of teaching, learning and organizational development that reflects a spirit of inclusion, where all members are invited to collaborate and interact with colleagues across disciplines and borders.

The POD Mission

The Professional and Organizational Development Network in Higher Education (POD) fosters human development in higher education through faculty, instructional, and organizational development.

POD believes that people have value, as individuals and as members of groups. The development of students is a fundamental purpose of higher education and requires for its success effective advising, teaching, leadership, and management. Central to POD’s philosophy is lifelong, holistic, personal, and professional learning, growth, and change for the higher education community.


OVERVIEW OF THE ANNUAL CONFERENCE

The annual POD Network conference typically attracts between 700 and 1,000 people, and primarily targets practitioners in the fields of educational and organizational development, both novice and experienced. The conference appeals to administrators, faculty, educational developers, graduate and professional student developers, graduate students, independent consultants, members of higher education organizations, and publishers for these communities.

Collectively, program sessions do the following:

  • Actively engage participants
  • Reflect current research and theoretical frameworks
  • Involve colleagues from around the world
  • Address needs of graduate students and both new and experienced faculty
  • Stimulate personal growth
  • Build working partnerships
  • Highlight contributions of diversity

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

Proposal submission is now closed. Proposals featuring best practices, new resources, innovative approaches, discussion of critical issues, presentation of research and work-in-progress were submitted online and were due on Friday, March 11, 2016. All proposals were evaluated using a blind peer-review process. Detailed information about the session types, topic areas, guidelines for submission, submission process, and the Robert J. Menges Honored Presentation Award are included in the Call for Proposals.


PLENARY SESSION

2016 Keynote Speaker: Nikki Giovanni
Friday, November 11, 10:30 am–12:00 noon

 

Nikki Giovanni

About Nikki Giovanni
“I was asked to do a biography so this is it. I am 71 years old. I highly recommend old age; it’s fun. I have been awarded an unprecedented 7 NAACP Image Awards which makes me very very proud. I have been nominated for a Grammy; been a finalist for the National Book Award. I am very proud to have authored 3 New York Times and Los Angeles Times Best Sellers, highly unusual for a poet. I am a University Distinguished Professor at Virginia Tech. I don’t have a lot of friends but I have good ones. I have a son and a granddaughter. My father, mother, sister and middle aunt are all deceased literally making me go from being the baby in the family to being an elder. I like to cook, travel and dream. I’m a writer. I’m happy.”

For a full biography and more information about Giovanni’s body of work, please visit http://www.nikki-giovanni.com/


PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS

Pre-conference Workshop co-chairs: Katie Kearns (kkearns@indiana.edu) and Molly Sutphen (msutphen@email.unc.edu).

Full Day Pre-Conference Workshop

This year’s full-day Pre-Conference Workshops (W1 and W2) begin Wednesday, November 9, 1:30–4:30 pm, and continue on Thursday, November 10, 8:30 am–12:00 noon.

W1—Getting Started: Workshop for New Faculty Developers, $160

Breakfast on Thursday is included for participants of W1. In addition, participants of W1 receive a copy of A Guide to Faculty Development, 2nd Ed.

  • Isis Artze-Vega, Florida International University
  • Jason Craig, Marymount University
  • Peter Felten, Elon University
  • Tershia Pinder-Grover, University of Michigan
  • Suzanne Tapp, Texas Tech University

In this interactive workshop, we will explore both the range of educational development work and common teaching/learning center practices. We will focus on: identifying and acting on educational development priorities in your own context; building skills for consulting, collaborating, and mentoring; assessing your work at an individual and a program/center level; and evaluating the strategic position of your efforts to maximize opportunities to influence institutional change. Each participant will leave the session with an individual action plan, a big-picture view of educational development, and a support network to help you achieve your goals.

Topics: Faculty Professional Development, POD Professional Development

Audience: New/recent faculty developers (5  years or less)

W2—Seven Steps to Publishing SoTL, $130
  • Milton Cox
  • Gregg Wentzell

As educational developers, our responsibilities include assisting interested faculty in developing SoTL. In this workshop two editors of SoTL journals guide participants through 7 steps they can use to enable their faculty to grasp a perspective of SoTL, select a teaching, learning, or institutional problem or opportunity, design a related project (solution, baseline, assessment), draft a proposal for presentation, and use that to leverage a manuscript for publication. We will share resources enabling your faculty to traverse these seven steps. Producing SoTL requires fostering a culture of deep learning, and we will assist you in developing that culture.

Topics: SoTL, Research, POD Professional Development

Audience: All POD Members, New/recent faculty developers (5 years or less)

Half-day Pre-Conference Workshops

Thursday, November 10, 8:30 am–12:00 noon.

(Breakfast is not included with half-day workshops. All half-day workshops are $70)

W3—Classroom Assessment Reconsidered
  • Claire Howell Major, University of Alabama Tuscaloosa
  • Elizabeth Barkley, Foothill College

Many college teachers seek to create transformative learning experiences for students, but struggle with how to achieve this in ways that can also be efficiently and effectively assessed. We will share a new approach to course-based, teacher-driven classroom assessment called Learning Assessment Techniques (LATs) that braid teaching, active learning and assessment together to create a seamless, unified process. Participants will then explore 3 techniques in depth that have been carefully crafted to help students cultivate genuine connections within and beyond the classroom in ways that cross boundaries and result in deep, transformative learning.

Topics: Assessment, Faculty Professional Development, Teaching & Learning

Audience: All POD members, Faculty (conference attendees who are faculty and also part-time developers)

W4—Starting Out in Leadership Development: Sowing Seeds of Organizational Change
  • Deborah DeZure, Michigan State University
  • David Kiel, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Increasingly faculty developers are asked to provide leadership development for administrators and faculty. While faculty development theory, research and practice provide a strong base from which to move into leadership development, there are new challenges. This session will assist faculty developers to design, implement, and assess high quality programs of leadership development for their institutions. Drawing on theory and research on higher education leadership, leadership development, leadership pipelines, and organizational change, this program will identify key strategic decisions, program models, and resources to enable participants to design successful leadership development initiatives that align with their institutional needs and goals.

Topics: Organizational Development, Faculty Professional Development, Programs

Audience: Large colleges and universities, Administrators, Seasoned Educational Developers

W5—Transforming Toxic Relationships in Academe: Fostering a Culture of Collegiality
  • Elizabeth Roderick, University of Alaska Anchorage
  • Shawnalee Whitney, University of Alaska Anchorage
  • Loraleigh Keashly, Wayne State University

Toxic person-to-person interactions within academic departments seriously disrupt the possibilities for deeper learning for the higher education community and have substantial costs for institutions. Faculty development centers can lead in a revolutionary way by offering tools and resources to help transform departmental relationships and dynamics. Drawing from a wide range of research and university and societal sources, facilitators will offer an overview of toxic behavior in departments; tools and resources to address the issue; interactive training in bystander interventions; and help participants explore ways their centers can lay the groundwork for collegial cultures that support deep learning.

Topics: Faculty Professional Development, Diversity, Organizational Development

Audience: All POD members, Faculty (conference attendees who are faculty and also part-time developers), Administrators

W6—Consultation as Border Crossing: Shifting from Customer Service to Thought Partnerships
  • Jeff Nugent, Colgate University
  • Enoch Hale, Virginia Commonwealth University

This interactive workshop is designed to help participants think through the shift we are attempting to make in our work – and our identities – from “fixers” to “collaborators.” This requires changing how we approach our work as directors, as consultants, as technologists, along with the development of new skills and practices. This session provides a framework and two methods for cultivating transformative partnerships between faculty, center staff and administrators. Participants will contextualize the frameworks and strategies in this session and formulate initial plans for helping centers shift away from the more pervasive attitudes that perpetuate service-only stereotypes.

Topics: Faculty Professional Development, Teaching and Learning, Technology

Audience: New/recent faculty developers (5 years or less), Instructional Technologists and technology integration specialists

W7—Assignment Design Workshop: Best of the Transparency and NILOA Frameworks
  • Mary-Ann Winkelmes, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
  • Jilian Kinzie, Indiana University

This interactive workshop engages participants in sharing their own assignments and in promoting assignment design that benefits the learning of all students, especially underserved students. Best practices from two national projects will be implemented: the National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment (NILOA) and the Transparency in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education Project (TILT Higher Ed). This workshop is also a train-the-trainers session that includes active participation and metacognitive reflection, as well as a “how-to” manual. Participants will also have the opportunity to publish their assignments with commentary in NILOA’s online Assignment Library and join TILT Higher Ed’s implementation/research efforts.

Topics: Faculty Professional Development, Diversity, Retention

Audience: All POD members, institutions with large numbers of underserved students

W8—Managing Teams Using the CATME System: Practice Informed by Research
  • Misty L. Loughry, Georgia Southern University
  • Matthew W. Ohland, Purdue University
  • Daniel M. Ferguson, Purdue University
  • David J. Woehr, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

The workshop will introduce participants to free, web-based tools, for managing student teams. We review factors that instructors should consider when assigning students to teams and administering peer evaluations. Participants discuss their own experiences and practices, and we share relevant literature. We conduct interactive, hands-on, activities using the Team-Maker and CATME Peer Evaluation systems and demonstrate training tools that teach students to evaluate and rate teamwork behaviors accurately using a science-based model of teamwork. We help faculty understand how the tools support cooperative learning. Attendees with laptops, tablets, or smartphones will interact with the system in real-time.

Topics: Faculty Professional Development, Graduate Student Professional Development, Assessment

Audience: All POD Members

W9—Building a Social Media Presence for Centers and Educational Developers
  • Phillip M. Edwards, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • German E. Vargas Ramos, Otterbein University / University of MassachusettsAmherst
  • Bonnie B. Mullinix, Teaching, Learning and Technology Group (TLT Group)/Walden University
  • Bradford D. Wheeler, University of MassachusettsAmherst
  • Antonia Levy, CUNY School of Professional Studies
  • Olena Zhadko, New York Institute of Technology
  • Linda Bruenjes, Suffolk University
  • Raj Chaudhury, Auburn University

Social media use has propagated among educational developers and Centers of Teaching and Learning, accompanied by a corresponding increase in the number of POD sessions exploring this domain. This pre-conference workshop extends these conversations in a guided, practical format, challenging us to be more intentional, open, and empathetic in our social media outreach as we champion innovation in teaching and learning. Workshop activities are designed to help participants reflect on their investments in social media, develop strategies to augment their Center’s online presence, and engage other POD members through the various social media platforms currently used by our community.

Topics: POD Professional Development, Technology

Audience: All POD members, Administrators

W10—Connection Through the Transformative Power of Reflexivity
  • Samantha Clifford, Northern Arizona University

This highly interactive session will model a series of teaching activities to foster deep learning about how our individual identities (either knowingly or unknowingly) impact the relationships we form. Strategies will address how social identity perpetuates power and privilege. Deep learning will occur through reflexive activities, collaborative endeavors, and understanding the sedimented view and an analysis of our own responses. Participants will learn how to assist others to reframe how they perceive themselves in relation to the world and others. This workshop aims to help participants build deeper connections between students, faculty and administrators by placing value on person-to-person interactions.

Topics: Teaching & Learning, Diversity, Faculty Professional Development

Audience: All POD members, Faculty (conference attendees who are faculty and also part-time developers)

W11—Fostering Deeper Adjunct/Part-Time Socialization through Transforming Programming
  • Teresa Focarile, Boise State University
  • Lindsay Bernhagen,The Ohio State University
  • Lori Schroeder, Metropolitan State University
  • Steven Hansen, Duquesne University
  • Ann Coburn-Collins, Saginaw Valley State University
  • Eli Collins-Brown, Western Michigan University
  • Jim Stenerson, Pace University

Using the Delphi Project’s model, facilitators from the Adjunct and Part-Time Special Interest Group will walk participants through better understanding their adjuncts’ needs, sharing that understanding with stakeholders, and advocating for and offering strategies in response. Throughout the workshop, there will be ample opportunities for individual and group consultation to help participants develop an action plan that they can implement upon return to their own campuses. Facilitators and participants will explore a variety of programming options that serve to integrate adjuncts into a campus culture of teaching, such as face-to-face and online orientations, workshops, learning communities, and teaching excellence recognition.

Topics: Adjunct Professional Development, POD Professional Development, Organizational Development

Audience: All POD members, Administrators

W12—Designing Blended Courses and Educational Development: Research, Strategies and Resources
  • Traci Stromie, Kennesaw State University
  • Josie Baudier, Kennesaw State University
  • Katie E. Linder, Oregon State University

Blended learning leverages the best of two modalities to facilitate courses that combine face-to-face interaction with aligned online activities, often with a reduction in face-to-face classroom time.  Although this modality has been in use for several years, many educational developers need to learn more in order to best assist faculty with blended teaching experiences. In this intensive pre-conference workshop, participants will review research on blended learning, outline programming about or in the blended modality, explore technologies that support the blended modality, and brainstorm ways to expand faculty audiences through blended teaching and learning programs and services.

Topics: Programs, Organizational Development, Administration

Audience: All POD members, Instructional Technologists and technology integration specialists

W13—How’s It Going? Reflecting on Our Work
  • Kathryn D. Cunningham, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
  • Shaun Longstreet, Marquette University
  • Stephanie Rohdieck, The Ohio State University
  • Kevin Gannon, Grand View University
  • Kimberly Eby, George Mason University

Congratulations—you’re doing faculty development! What are the opportunities, challenges, and risks before you: reaching all constituents, budgeting, prioritizing, advocating, establishing your professional identity, evaluating your program, meeting increased demands?  “How’s it Going?” offers early and mid-career faculty developers an opportunity to consult with peers and experienced mentors. Prior to the session, participants submit an issue they face. The session provides a safe place to collaborate with colleagues in reflecting on their specific issues, and together, identifying strategies. The process helps professionals build a sense of efficacy as leaders and establish relationships with colleagues across the career spectrum.

Topics: Faculty Professional Development, Graduate Student Professional Development

Audience: New/recent faculty developers (5 years or less), mid-career faculty developers

W14—Identifying Your Pathway to Becoming a Strong Center Leader
  • Angela R. Linse, Pennsylvania State University (Penn State)
  • Taimi Olsen, University of Tennessee
  • Laurel Willingham-McLain, Duquesne University

Many teaching center directors lack management and leadership preparation for effectively leading a center. Experienced directors from three very different centers will facilitate an exploration of:

  1. diverse pathways to center leadership and the relevant skills and knowledge;
  2. center operations such as financial management, personnel, policies and procedures; and
  3. institutional contexts and strategic decision-making.

Participants will explore their pathways to leadership, self-assess their applicable knowledge and skills, and develop a specific plan for ongoing development. They will also receive practical tools and models to support day-to-day effectiveness.

Topics: POD Professional Development, Administration, Organizational Development, Center Director Development

Audience: Seasoned faculty developers, New or aspiring center directors

W15—Taking Flight: Opening (or Revitalizing) a New Center for Teaching and Learning
  • Cher C. Hendricks, University of West Georgia
  • Laura Cruz, Tennessee Technological University

Whether you are opening a new Center or revitalizing your current Center, this highly interactive, hands-on workshop will provide an opportunity to work with experienced coaches to develop short- and long-term plans to help your CTL be successful. The workshop begins with activities to help participants identify resources, institutional priorities, challenges, and opportunities. Coaches will then share strategies conducting a needs assessment, building networks, setting the Center’s goals and priorities, and cultivating a campus culture that supports excellence in teaching and learning. Working with colleagues and coaches from similar institution types, participants will create action plans to achieve their goals.

Topics: Start-up

Audience: New/recent faculty developers (5 years or less), Small colleges and universities, Large colleges and universities

W16: Confronting Microagressions with Microresistance and Ally Development
  • Cynthia Ganote, Saint Mary’s College of California
  • Floyd Cheung, Smith College
  • Tasha Souza, Boise State University

We often discuss ways to lead difficult dialogues amongst our students, and even ways to serve as allies to students experiencing classroom-based microaggressions. However, what do we do when we witness colleagues who are the targets of microaggressions? This pre-conference workshop will examine ways in which microaggressions particularly impact women of all races and ethnicities, faculty and staff of color, and LGBT faculty and staff in academia. In response, we can use constructive tools to serve as allies to our colleagues. This focus on empowerment allows us to take action in our local environments, thereby lessening the impact upon colleagues when microaggressions occur.

Topics: Diversity, Administration, POD Network Professional Development

Audience: All POD Network members, Administrators

W17: Confronting the Racial Reality: Supporting Faculty of Color
  • Cheryl Richardson, University of Delaware
  • Cameron Harris, George Mason University

In this session, presenters will introduce literature that describes the experiences of underrepresented faculty and educational developers on college and university campuses. Participants will be guided through practices for advocacy towards equity and social justice, while engaging in self-care. Attendees will be encouraged to reflect on personal experiences supporting peers in educational environments. The focus of this session will be on practical application of support mechanisms, and what faculty development can do to support our educational quest for inclusion.

Topics: Diversity; Faculty Professional Development

Audience: Seasoned Faculty Developers, Faculty


CONCURRENT SESSIONS

A full schedule of concurrent sessions will be available here in late summer 2016.

  • 75-minute interactive sessions: Co-chairs Sal Meyers (sal.meyers@simpson.edu) and Julie A. Sievers (julies@stedwards.edu).  Interactive sessions combine brief presentations or panel discussions with methods that engage all participants, reflecting POD’s long-standing tradition of interactive, collegial sessions.
  • 75-minute roundtable discussions: Co-chairs Lisa Kurz (Kurz@indiana.edu) and Steven Jones (steven.jones@gcsu.edu). Roundtable discussions provide an opportunity for various kinds of interactions in a smaller group setting (10–15 people), such as discussion of a concept, approach, program, issue, case study, or reading.
  • 35-minute research presentations: Co-chairs Mary-Ann Winkelmes (Mary-Ann.Winkelmes@unlv.edu) and Michael Sweet (m.sweet@neu.edu). Research sessions include a presentation and discussion of new or ongoing educational, professional, or organizational development research. Session leaders present their original research for the first 20–25 minutes, reserving 10–15 minutes for Q&A.
  • Poster Sessions: Co-chairs Bill Rando (williamrando@uchicago.edu) and Kathy Jackson (klj11@psu.edu). The poster session provides an ideal format for presenting in a context where colleagues can engage in many one-on-one discussions, facilitated by well-designed posters, as well as supplemental materials.

Concurrent sessions may address one or more of the topics and audiences below. Topic and audience designations will be listed in the program.

Topics:
  • Adjunct Professional Development: Practices, processes, theories, techniques, programs pertaining specifically to adjunct or part-time faculty development.
  • Administration: Budgeting, funding, management, planning, performance appraisal, staff/faculty recruitment and retention, and other issues concerning the administration of a center or other unit.
  • Assessment: Measuring the effectiveness of an aspect of practice and/or outcomes in order to improve (designate other topics to indicate the subject of assessment—e.g., teaching & learning, programs, Faculty PD).
  • Diversity: addressing under-represented or minority populations on campus, in the classroom, in administration.
  • Faculty Professional Development: Practices, processes, theories, techniques, programs pertaining to faculty development.
  • Graduate Student Professional Development: Practices, processes, theories, techniques, programs pertaining specifically to graduate and professional student development.
  • Organizational Development: Practices, processes, theories, or techniques related to the systemic development of institutions and organizations.
  • POD Professional Development: Practices, processes, theories, techniques, programs pertaining to development of those in the professions represented by POD (e.g., Center staff, technologists, etc.).
  • Programs: Organization, implementation, practices, theories, techniques related to programs and services (in centers and other units).
  • Research: Systematic, generalizable investigations into clearly defined questions, employing accepted methods for data collection and analysis (designate other topics to indicate the subject of research—e.g., teaching & learning, programs, Faculty PD).
  • Retention: Practices, processes, theories, techniques related to retaining students and improving graduation rates.
  • SoTL: Practice of, results of, and programs supporting Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.
  • Start-up: Practices, processes, organizational ideas related to establishment and growth of centers, programs, or other projects.
  • Sustainability: incorporating applying principles of environmental and/or programmatic sustainability into educational development work.
  • Teaching & Learning: Practices, processes, theories, techniques related to classroom and other teaching and learning.
  • Technology: Explorations of current and new technologies that can support teaching, program or organizational development.
Audiences:
  • Administrators
  • All POD Network members
  • Community colleges
  • Faculty (conference attendees who are faculty and also part-time developers)
  • Graduate teaching assistants or those supporting this population
  • Historically black colleges and universities
  • International POD participants
  • Instructional technologists and technology integration specialists
  • Large colleges and universities
  • New/recent educational developers (5 years or less)
  • Seasoned educational developers
  • Small colleges and universities
  • Other (please specify)

SPECIAL SESSIONS: POD-SPONSORED, SUNDAY ANCHOR

In addition to the standard pre-conference workshops, 75-minute sessions, 35-minute sessions, and poster sessions, the POD conference includes POD-sponsored sessions and an anchor session to close the event. POD-sponsored sessions are sponsored and submitted by members of various POD committees, then reviewed and vetted by POD’s Core Committee. The Anchor Session, a blind-reviewed accepted session that has particular importance and/or broad interest to POD Network membership, is chosen by the Conference Committee.

This year’s Anchor Session, “Teaching Across Cultural Strengths in Transformative Relationship,” will be held on Sunday morning, 8:45–10:15 am. Alicia Fedelina Chavez (University of New Mexico) and Susan Diana Longerbeam (Northern Arizona University)  will introduce a model of Cultural Frameworks of Teaching and Learning and will include interactive and introspective activities to work in transformative relationship with self, colleagues, and students to reflect on how personal cultural norms, values, assumptions, and beliefs play in college courses and develop a greater balance of teaching across cultural strengths.

Alicia Fedelina Chávez

Alicia Fedelina Chavez
Alicia Fedelina Chávez, Ph.D., is Associate Professor in Teacher Education, Educational Leadership and Policy at the University of New Mexico. She served as a collegiate leader, student affairs professional, and faculty member in universities around the country, including serving as the senior executive officer for a campus in Northern New Mexico, serving as Dean of Students at the University of Wisconsin—Madison, and serving as Diversity Development Officer at Iowa State University. She holds a Ph.D. in Higher Education—Policy Studies from the University of Arizona, a master’s degree in Student Affairs/Higher Education Administration from Iowa State University, and a bachelor’s degree in psychology from New Mexico State University. She regularly works with faculty, student affairs professionals, and central administrators in the area of transforming colleges and universities to more effectively teach and serve diverse populations. Her current consulting, faculty development, leadership development, teaching, and scholarship are centered in facilitating understanding and balance between cultural epistemologies and ways of being in professional practice. She works from a belief that higher education institutions and societies benefit from garnering the strengths of many Peoples, cultures, and nations.

Dr. Chávez’s scholarship focuses in areas of culture and college teaching as well as identity and collegiate leadership. Her publications include two coauthored books on culture and college teaching, Teaching Across Cultural Strengths (Stylus, 2016) and Web Based Teaching Across Culture and Age (Springer, 2013), as well as two coedited books on identity and leadership in higher education, Identity & Leadership: Informing Our Lives, Informing Our Practice (NASPA, 2013) and Indigenous Leadership in Higher Education (Routledge, 2015). Her academic journal articles include “Clan, Sage, and Sky: Indigenous, Hispano and Mestizo Narratives of Learning in New Mexico Context”; “Toward a Multicultural Ecology of Teaching and Learning”; “Leading in the Borderlands: Negotiating Ethnic Patriarchy for the Benefit of Students”; “Spirit of Place: Crafting a College in Northern New Mexico Rhythm”; “Spirit and Nature: Reflections of a Mestiza in Higher Education”; and “Learning to Value the ‘Other’: A Model of Diversity Development.”

Susan Diana Longerbeam

Susan Diana Longerbeam
Susan Diana Longerbeam, Ph.D., is Associate Professor in Educational Psychology at Northern Arizona University, where she leads a graduate student affairs program. She served as a university health services director and interim dean of students at Oregon State University, and she holds a Ph.D. in College Student Personnel from the University of Maryland, a master’s degree in Health Services Administration from Antioch University, and a bachelor’s degree in Community Studies from the University of California, Santa Cruz. She served on the ACPA Commission on Professional Preparation and the NASPA Faculty Fellows and Council.

Dr. Longerbeam’s scholarship focuses on culture and college teaching, campus climate, and student success in higher education. Her publications include a coauthored book on culture and college teaching, Teaching Across Cultural Strengths (Stylus, 2016). Recent journal articles include “We Cannot Reach Them”: Chinese Undergraduate Student Perceptions of the U.S. Campus Climate” (2013); “Putting Old Tensions to Rest: Integrating Multicultural Education and Global Learning to Advance Student Development” (2013); “Developing Openness to Diversity in Living-Learning Program Participants” (2010); and “Contemporary College Contexts: College Environments for Student Learning and Retention at a Southwestern U.S. University” (2010); and reflective work: “Encounters with Angels: A Struggle to Return Home from Study Abroad” (2015); “One Journey of Compassion: My Search for Inspiriting Leadership (2013); “‘You Home? Meet Me on the Stairway’: Lessons of Living Together” (2009).


POD UNCONFERENCE

Co-chairs Patty Payette (patty.payette@louisville.edu), Diane Boyd (deb0020@auburn.edu), and Nick Yates (nicholas.yates@zu.ac.ae). POD Unconference (POD-U) provides conference participants with opportunities to engage in peer-to-peer learning, collaborative activities, and creative experiences. POD-U is about YOU, the conference participant! Similar to unconferences held at other events, POD-U is a largely participant-driven track, allowing you to decide what topics and discussions take place. These just-in-time learning experiences are an excellent opportunity for you to share what you know or to learn about something new. In addition to sessions planned and facilitated by conference participants, we have organized several sessions for you to share resources and to engage in conversations with experienced faculty developers and POD committee members.

POD-U SESSIONS

POD-U sessions, offered throughout the conference, are participant-driven events. These sessions are ideal for discussing challenges you are facing at your institution, sharing resources you have developed, discussing ideas or issues that emerge during the conference, solving a problem, developing new resources, sharing a personal talent, or simply meeting others with similar (and diverse!) interests. In addition to the events to the events below, look for other POD U interactive sessions identified throughout the program.

Ready, Set, Collaborate!

Friday, November 11, 3:45–5:00 pm in Grand Ballroom C

This is crowdsourcing at its best for us faculty developers and our our peskiest problems! Show up ready to share your knottiest or most persistent problem in your educational development. You will pair up and reflect, write and connect with others to distill and share a list of your most compelling work-related problems. Be prepared to review the larger group list and in order to vote and then work with others on the challenges you want to tackle. Smaller groups will coalesce around the top issues and and then be given some tools and a time limit to brainstorm solutions to those “hot spots”. Be ready to collaborate, come up with brilliant solutions, and then share them concisely and creatively with the larger group.

Not Your Normal Poster Session

Saturday, November 12, 3:00–4:15 pm in Grand Ballroom C.

This unconference session invites you to spontaneously collaborate with other participants session to identify, organize, and present a paper or digital poster on a hot topic in teaching and learning—all within the timeframe of the session. The trick is to define the topic, ground your ideas in the research, evidence, and personal best practices, and then come up with a creative way to share your ideas for advancing conversation on the topic. Participants will shape an approach to that topic that is poster-worthy, bringing together recommendations drawn from professional experience and/or the scholarship to support relevant findings and approaches.  The session will conclude with a gallery walk (in person and digitally, using padlet) so participants can both learn in the moment and return to the posters after the conference while also networking over shared interests with colleagues during and after the session. Collaboration, creativity and citations are all a must!


BIRDS OF A FEATHER

Birds of a Feather (BoFs) sessions are informal conversations designed to foster relationships between experienced faculty developers and colleagues new to the field, and are intended to promote more meaningful interaction and deeper relationships than can sometimes occur during regular conference sessions. Each BoFs session is facilitated by an experienced faculty developer with expertise in a particular topic. All sessions take place on Friday from 7:30–8:45 AM. More information on specific BOFs will be available summer 2016, as well as in the Conference Program. Please contact BOF coordinators for more information: Jody Horn, (Jhorn9@uco.edu) and Stephanie Rohdieck (rohdieck.1@osu.edu).


EARN DIGITAL BADGES IN LOUISVILLE!

POD Network 2016 Learner Badge  POD Network 2016 Presenter Badge

All attendees at the 2016 POD Network Conference will be eligible to earn a “Learner” badge; presenters can also earn a “Presenter” badge. The POD Network’s Special Interest Group on Teaching with Technology (SIG­TwT) is organizing this as a way for attendees to have a meaningful experience with an emerging technology. We also hope to stimulate discussion about digital badges in educational development. Let a badge be your incentive to dig deeply into ideas you encounter at the conference!

Here’s how it will work:

  1. Get the details.
    Learn about the program; you don’t get a badge for just showing up.
  2. Complete the requirements.
    To show what you learned, create an artifact and write a reflection.
  3. Submit the evidence.
    If your work meets the requirements you’ll get a badge claim ticket.
  4. Share the badge.
    Claim and display it on LinkedIn, Facebook, or a professional website.

These badges will be:

  • User­friendly ­ easy to sign up, post evidence, and request a badge.
  • Open ­ it’s not a contest; any attendee who meets the criteria can earn the badge.
  • Compatible ­ with Credly.com as the back end, badges are transportable.

Complete information will be posted on the POD Network website and included in conference
packets—it will also be available through the mobile app.


CONFERENCE BUDDY PROGRAM

Deadline, October 24, 2016
The Conference Buddy program is designed to connect you with other attendees familiar with the ins and outs of the conference. After signing up you will be matched with your conference buddy. You are encouraged to connect (via email/phone) prior to the conference and arrange a few times to meet during the conference: during coffee breaks, lunches, receptions, dinners, or at educational expeditions. Things you might talk about include what sessions to attend, not-to-be-missed conference events, ways to get involved in POD. The earlier and more often you connect, the better. Upon enrollment, you will receive an email with your buddy match.

sign-up now

 


THE DOCTOR IS IN

Friday, November 11, 3:45–5:15 pm
In this session, participants have an opportunity to work individually and informally with members of the POD Research Committee and Grants Committee to discuss issues related to conducting educational research, Scholarship of Teaching and Learning research, or writing a competitive POD Network grant proposal.  Research discussed can be of various kinds, quantitative as well as qualitative, related to teaching, learning, assessment, evaluation, and professional, organizational, or instructional development. This session takes place with the poster sessions on Friday from 3:45–5:15 pm.


CAREER FAIR

The Career Fair will be held on Friday morning from 9:00–10:15 am. This session should be considered a networking “meet and greet” opportunity, not a time for formal interviews. Job candidates are likely to have more success if they meet face-to-face with potential employers rather than just dropping off a resume; the time can then be used to learn more about the position and the employing institution. Potential employers can use this time to plan a subsequent interview during the conference. More information will be distributed to POD members and conference registrants in the early fall by Job Fair coordinator Kaury Kucera (kaury.kucera@gmail.com).


COMMITTEE/SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP OUTREACH SESSION

New in 2016! POD committees and Special Interest Groups are invited to participate in an Outreach Session to be held during the Resource Fair on Friday evening from 5:00–6:45 pm.  This session is intended to give POD conference participants a chance to learn about the mission and initiatives of these committees and groups in order to make an informed decision about how the would like to get involved in POD.

 

GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL STUDENT DEVELOPERS NETWORKING LUNCH AND COMMITTEE MEETING

A Graduate and Professional Student Development (GPSD) Networking Lunch will be held on Thursday, 12:00–1:00 pm. This event provides an opportunity for graduate students, postdoctoral scholars, and those engaged in graduate and professional student development to connect with each other early in the POD Conference. Graduate & Professional Student Developers are also welcome to attend. GPSD subcommittee chairs will be in attendance to provide conference and job market mentorship.

The GPSD Committee will meet Saturday, 9:00–10:15 am. All Graduate & Professional Student Developers are welcome to attend as we discuss directions, issues, and activities for the group and for the committee.

A note for past POD conference attendees: the GPSD committee meeting will no longer take place during breakfast.


RESOURCE FAIR

The Resource Fair provides a venue for you to find or exchange information and resources relevant to our work as organizational developers. This is a great opportunity to socialize while acquiring new information or by sharing activities, resources, and services that benefit the POD community. The Resource Fair features tables only from college- and university-affiliated programs and from non-profit organizations. The Resource Fair and Reception will be held on Friday evening from 5:15–6:45 pm. Materials and services may NOT be offered for sale or promoted for sale during the Resource Fair.

Note: If you wish to have a table at the Resource Fair, you must register for the conference and reserve your table in advance by checking the appropriate box on the conference registration form. You or your representative should plan to be at your table to talk with conference participants during the entire session. There is no fee. More information about the Resource Fair will be distributed in the early fall to those who have reserved a table by Resource Fair coordinator Ruth Poproski, ruth.poproski@gatech.edu.


VENDOR EXHIBIT

The Vendor Exhibit will be held all day (roughly 8AM to 5PM) on Thursday, Friday and Saturday. The Vendor Exhibit and Vendor Workshops (see below) are the only times at the conference when items or services may be promoted or offered for sale. We welcome publishers, consultants, and others. If you wish to purchase a table at this event, you must reserve your place in advance by checking the appropriate box on the conference registration form.

Individual (3 days): $150 (for a self-employed person)

Individual (2 days): $100 (for a self-employed person)

Corporate (3 days only): $400 (for businesses/corporations)


VENDOR INTERACTIVE WORKSHOPS

Vendors who have sponsored the POD conference at the Bronze Level or higher have the opportunity to present a 75 minute interactive workshop. Interactive workshops are not strictly commercials; rather, they are intended to reflect the engaged and research-based approach of the POD community. The Vendor Exhibit and Vendor Workshops are the only times at the conference when items or services may be promoted or offered for sale.

If you wish to be a sponsor at the Bronze Level or higher, contact the main office at podoffice@podnetwork.org before August 15.


LOUISVILLE EXCURSIONS

To pay for excursions separately or to add a spouse or friend, send an email with full details to: <podoffice@podnetwork.org>.

 

DATE
AFTERNOON
EVENING
Wednesday, November 9 5:00–7:00 pm
NuLu Foodie Excursion
SOLD OUT
Thursday, November 10
Friday, November 11 12:30–5:00 pm
Art & Science of Learning
12:30–5:00 pm
Churchill Downs Fall Meet
Saturday, November 12 3:00–5:00 pm
Downtown Arts Excursion
6:30–9:00 pm
Spirit of Jefferson Dinner Cruise
SOLD OUT
Sunday, November 13 11:00 am–2:30 pm
Baseball and Bourbon

NuLu Foodie Excursion SOLD OUT
Nulu Foodie Excursion
Nulu Foodie Excursion

Get introduced to award-winning Louisville food culture in the most delicious way possible! With diverse options like brisket, chicken, pulled pork, smoked tofu, sweet potato fries, mac and cheese, baked beans, collard greens and more, everyone will find something to love at Feast BBQ. Don’t miss the fried pickles! Afterwards, you can either return to the Galt House or pay a visit to Akasha Brewing, Louisville Beer Store, and other nearby NuLu destinations

  • Date: Wednesday, November 9
  • Cost: $25
  • Time: 4:30 pm departure, gather at Feast BBQ at 5:00 pm, return to Galt House at 7:00 pm
  • Included: Will get voucher for set amount of money for dinner/drinks at Feast. Anything over cost will be responsibility of attendee. For the optional destinations, visitors will be on their own
  • # of People: 10 minimum, 25 maximum
  • Transportation: Zero bus from Galt House and back. Zero bus stops running at 7:00 pm. Anyone staying after 7:00 pm will need to get back to Galt House on their own. (1.4 mile walk, estimated 28-minute walk. Cab ride would be less than 5 minutes.)
  • Feast BBQ: http://www.feastbbq.com/

Churchill Downs Racetrack Fall Meet
Churchill Downs Fall Meet

Experience the exciting and colorful spectacle of thoroughbred racing at legendary Churchill Downs. Stroll through the popular Derby museum, visit its historic grounds, and enjoy the ambiance of one of the most hallowed shrines in American sports. The Fall Meet is in session and the betting windows are open! Good luck!

  • Date: Friday, November 11
  • Cost: $75 a person for 25–34 people. Includes entry into the Derby Museum, lunch at the café, general admission to the track and transportation via mid-size coach.
  • Time: 12:30 pm departure, lunch at track 1:00 pm, return to Galt House at 5:00 pm
  • Included: lunch, museum tour, optional walking tour of track, general admission to races and transportation
  • # of People: 35 or more for reduced cost
  • Transportation: door to door, coach service
  • URL: https://www.churchilldowns.com/visit/

Art & Science of Learning
Art & Science of Learning
Art & Science of Learning

Take a break from the conference and get to know more about what’s happening at the University of Louisville! Join us for a guided tour of the University of Louisville’s newly opened Technology Innovation and Learning Laboratory (TILL) and existing Delphi Center for Teaching and Learning, followed by a self-guided tour of the adjacent nationally recognized Speed Art Museum. The museum has been recently renovated and dramatically expanded for your viewing pleasure (café on site).

  • Date: Friday, November 11
  • Cost: $49 a person includes museum admission and transportation for 25–34 people ($39/each for 35 people), lunch on your own (café on site)
  • Time: 12:30 pm departure, return to Galt House at 5:00 pm
  • Included: UofL TILL tour, admission to Speed Art Museum and transportation
  • # of People: 35 or more for reduced cost
  • Transportation: door to door, coach service
  • Speed Museum: http://www.speedmuseum.org/
  • Delphi Center: http://louisville.edu/delphi/

Artist rendering of new Technology Innovation and Learning Laboratory (TILL) at the University of Louisville

Downtown Arts Excursion: Tour of Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft /21C Museum
Art Excursion
Art Excursion

Take a break to soak up some downtown culture! Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft honors Kentucky’s rich heritage of art and culture while looking forward to the future of the arts in the region. 21C Museum Hotel is a destination boutique hotel that combines cutting edge art and luxury with an art museum open around the clock! After visiting 21c, stay for a memorable dinner or a drink at the award-winning Proof on Main. (Reservations recommended.)

  • Date: Saturday, November 12
  • Cost: FREE!
  • Optional dinner or drink at Proof on Main.
  • Time: Gather at KMAC at 3:00 pm. Walk over to 21c at 4:00 pm. End for optional dinner at 5:00 pm at Proof
  • Included: Guided tours of KMAC and 21c, optional dinner at Proof
  • # of People: 20–25 on museum tours, Proof will need to be limited to a smaller number of people
  • Transportation: Walk- 0.4 (8-minute walk) from Galt House to KMAC/21C
  • 21c: http://www.21cmuseumhotels.com/louisville/
  • Proof: http://www.proofonmain.com/
  • KMAC: http://www.kmacmuseum.org/

Spirit of Jefferson Dinner Cruise SOLD OUT 
Spirit of Jefferson Dinner Cruise

Go back in time for a two-and-a-half hour river cruise and dinner aboard the Spirit of Jefferson. The Spirit has the look and feel of an old-time steamboat, with the modern conveniences of heat, air conditioning, and open, full views of the scenic river and shore. Join us as we create wonderful memories along the Ohio river, and see for yourself!

  • Date: Saturday, November 12
  • Cost: $42 a person
  • Time: Gather at 6:15 pm and walk over. Boat boards at 6:30 pm. Boat departs at 7:00 pm, 9:00 pm return.
  • Included: Dinner buffet and cruise
  • # of people: 45 Maximum
  • Transportation: Walk to dock (0.2 miles, 4-minute walk)
  • Spirit of Jefferson: http://www.belleoflouisville.org/the-spirit-of-jefferson.html

Baseball and Bourbon: Tours of the Louisville Slugger Museum and the Evan Williams Experience
Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory
Baseball and Bourbon

Experience firsthand two of Louisville’s Claims to Fame! You’ll start by visiting the Louisville Slugger Museum, home of the World’s Biggest Baseball Bat. The museum offers interactive and interesting exhibits along with a bat factory tour and batting cages. Visitors to the Louisville Slugger Museum receive a free mini wooden souvenir bat. After you visit the museum, you’ll walk to the Evan Williams Bourbon Experience where a guided tour will feature an operating artisanal distillery. You will not only learn the process for making bourbon, but you will see it being made right before your eyes. The tour also includes premium bourbon tastings and concludes in the retail shop where you can take home an array of signature items, including a personalized bottle of Evan Williams.

  • Date: Sunday, November 13
  • Cost: $26 total ($14 for Slugger Museum, $12 for Evan Williams Experience)
  • Time: 11:00 am gather. Walk over to Slugger Museum for tour. (Tours begin every 20 minutes.) Evan Williams tour begins at 1:20 pm. Tour will end by 2:30 pm
  • Included: Slugger Museum tour and mini-bat, Evan Williams Experience—Tour and bourbon tasting
  • # of people: Up to 20
  • Transportation: Walk- 0.5 (10-minute walk) from Galt House to Slugger Museum
  • Slugger Museum: http://www.sluggermuseum.com/
  • Evan Williams Experience: http://evanwilliams.com/visit.php
 Excursion Resources

POD MEMBERSHIP DUES

(in U.S. dollars)

Individual membership  $115 per person
Institutional Membership (when three or more join/renew from same inst.) $95 per person
Student or Retired  $65 per person

CONFERENCE REGISTRATION FEES

Conference registration fees do not include membership dues. If you would like to register at the lower, POD Network member rate, you must already be a member or you must renew or join before you register for the conference.

MEMBER REGISTRATION

NON-MEMBER REGISTRATION

 

 

All fees, outlined below, are in U.S. dollars and payment must be made in U.S. dollars.

  • Please note that the conference registration fee includes the designated conference meals, coffee breaks, and receptions. Registration includes three breakfasts (Friday, Saturday, Sunday), two dinners (Thursday and Friday) and one lunch (Saturday).
  • Pre-conference workshops, educational excursions, and tables at the vendor exhibit have additional fees and must be selected when you register.

Refund Policy: A full refund, minus $25 processing fee, will be made if cancellation is received by October 1, 2016. A $75 cancellation fee will be retained for cancellations received from October 2–15, 2016. Other than in the case of personal emergency, no refunds can be made after October 15, 2016. Substitutions in attendees may be made at any time. Because of transportation scheduling and contracts, refunds for excursions will be honored only if you cancel your entire conference registration before October 1.

CONFERENCE FEES Early Bird
Registration Fee 
(Postmarked or submitted online
through October 9; deadline strictly observed)
Post Early Bird
Registration Fee 
(Postmarked or submitted online from October 10 through November 5)
On-site Registration Fee

(On or after November 6)

Member $495 $555 $585
Non-member $645 $705 $735
Student (member) $325 $365 $385
Student (non-member) $485 $545 $565
Retired (member) $325 $365 $385
Retired (non-member) $485 $545 $565
One Day Only (member;
includes meal(s))
$230 $260 $320
One Day Only (non-member;
includes meal(s))
$325 $365 $415
Meals only for attendee’s guest
(for entire conference). Membership
is not required for meals only. Two dinners, one lunch, three breakfasts.
$325 $350 $350

HOTEL RESERVATIONS

Galt House Hotel

Address: 140 N 4th St, Louisville, KY 40202

Rates

$145 / night: Rivue Tower (Deluxe Guestroom: standard hotel room)
$165 / night: Suite Tower (Executive Suite: standard room with small parlor and couch, mini-fridge, wet bar)

Room examples here: http://www.galthouse.com/stay/

Rates are guaranteed until October 15, 2016 or until reserved block sells out. Reserve early to guarantee a room! Suite Tower rooms are limited.

For reservations phone: (502) 589-5200 or 1-800-The-Galt

Reservation link (Select “Attendee” under Guest Type Drop-Down):   https://resweb.passkey.com/go/POD16

  • All conference participants will have free access to the hotel gym (guests usually charged $15/day).
  • There will be free wifi access in all hotel guest rooms.

TRANSPORTATION

The nearest airport to the Galt Hotel is Louisville International Airport.

Louisville International Airport
600 Terminal Drive
Louisville, KY 40209
(502) 367-4636

Airport Transportation

Galt House Hotel has arranged airport transportation with your reservation via Sandollar Limousine. To take advantage of this service you can go directly to their website, www.sandollarlimo.com or www.galthouseshuttle.com to give your flight information and details. Payment can be attached to room billing.

  • $15 one-way per person
  • $25 round-trip person
  • Arrange your departing trip at the transportation desk directly at 502-561-4022
  • Operation hours: 7:00 am to 8:00 pm, will accommodate early or late arrivals by making arrangements
Cabs

Cost to airport from the Galt House Hotel is approximately $18

Zero Bus

The Zero covers a large area of downtown Louisville and gives easy access to many local attractions with the convenience of boarding in front of the hotel.

  • Free
  • Operation hours: Monday–Saturday, 7:30 am–11:00 pm
TARC

TARC is the local bus system. It is inexpensive to ride and pick-up is a block from the hotel.

Driving Directions

From Louisville International Airport (8.8 miles)—Take I-65 N to N 3rd St. Take exit 5B from I-64W. Continue onto N 3rd St. Drive to N 4th St.

Hotel Parking

Galt House Hotel has 3,200 on-site parking spaces available in our attached covered parking garage for our guests. The current charge is $15 per night. Valet parking is offered for $25 per night. Complimentary coach parking is available for tours and conventions.

Height requirements for our garages are 6’4″ for The Suite Tower and 6’8″ for The Rivue Tower. Buses or any other vehicles that are taller than the limit, are to check-in with valet and will be directed to special lots. All vehicles can be accommodated in the CITY RUN parking structure.


SHIPPING INFORMATION

The Galt House Hotel will only accept pre-paid packages. All packages must contain a label with the following information:

  1. Return address
  2. Addressed to:YOUR NAME HERE W/ DATE OF STAY
    140 N. 4th St.
    Louisville, KY 40202

All packages should be sent to arrive no earlier than October 27, 2016.

The following per-unit receiving fees apply (to be paid by the shipper or person picking up the package):

  • Under 10 lbs: $7
  • 11–21 lbs: $10
  • 22–30 lbs: $15
  • 31–45 lbs: $20
  • 46–60 lbs: $25
  • 61–100 lbs: $45
  • 101 lbs and up: $65